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Inflation Dynamics: The Case of Egypt

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Abstract

Inflation as a phenomenon has witnessed remarkable changes starting from mid-eighties of the last century. Inflation rates have become less persistent, less responsive to supply side shocks. In addition, the relative importance of demand pull inflation as one of the major determinants of inflation has decreased due to efficient monetary policies that have been adopted by central banks all over the world to reduce inflation based on anchoring inflation expectations. Moreover, the slope of Phillips curve has flattened as many factors have appeared to be more influential on inflation rather than output gap, namely inflation expectations. These changes constitute in the new economic literature what so called “Inflation Dynamics”. In this context, this study focuses on analyzing inflation dynamics in Egypt in (1980-2009) in order to identify to what extent “Inflation Dynamics” in Egypt is different from or similar to those witnessed globally. The study applied a Vector Auto Regressive model (VAR) and other econometrics models to analyze “Inflation Dynamics” in Egypt in three sub periods: the 1980s, the 1990s and the first decade of the new millennium. The study concluded that Inflation Dynamics in Egypt is completely different from those observed globally. Inflation rates in Egypt have become more persistent especially starting from 2000; Inflation shocks are now lasting longer and have a long-term impact on the future inflation paths. On the other hand, demand bull inflation still considers one of the most important inflation determinants, as it is solely responsible for explaining 30% of the changes in inflation rates. In addition, the study confirmed that inflation rates in Egypt have become more responsive to supply side shocks starting from 2006. As for the slope of Phillips curve, the study confirmed that similar to the changes observed globally, the slope of Phillips Curve for the Egypt economy has flattened reflecting the increasing importance of other inflation determinants rather than output gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali, Heba, 2011. "Inflation Dynamics: The Case of Egypt," MPRA Paper 36331, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:36331
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/36331/1/MPRA_paper_36331.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John M. Roberts, 2006. "Monetary Policy and Inflation Dynamics," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(3), September.
    2. Andrew T. Levin & Jeremy M. Piger, 2003. "Is inflation persistence intrinsic in industrial economies?," Working Papers 2002-023, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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    Cited by:

    1. El Baz, Osama, 2014. "The Determinants of Inflation in Egypt: An Empirical Study (1991-2012)," MPRA Paper 56978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Touny, Mahmoud, 2013. "Investigate the Long-Run Trade-Off between Inflation and Unemployment in Egypt," MPRA Paper 54561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:wsi:medjxx:v:05:y:2013:i:03:n:s1793812013500193 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-16-00704 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; Inflation dynamics; Inflation persistence; The Egyptian economy; Demand-pull inflation; Cost-push inflation; Inflation expectations; markets and prices rigidities; Phillips curve; Government debt; Monetary policies; Vector Auto Regression (VAR);

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation

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