IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/32499.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The federal funds rate in the post-Volcker era: evidence from Basic VAR

Author

Listed:
  • Jamilov, Rustam

Abstract

This paper proposes a comparative analysis of the federal funds rate. The analysis is based on the results of an empirical study, conducted using the econometrics of Vector Auto Regressions. The results are compared across two time periods: 1960-1979 and 1983-2002, the intervals representing the pre and post-Volcker monetary eras. The study examines the degree of exogeneity of the federal funds rate and its power to explain and predict variations in macroeconomic aggregates. The paper concludes that for the post-Volcker era the federal funds rate has become more exogenous; that the federal funds rate has remained a strong economic indicator; that the notion of “lean against the wind” monetary policy continues to be relevant and appropriate; that the “price effect” of the response of inflation to innovations in the federal funds rate has become smaller. The paper also suggests that the Federal Reserve has since the 1980s initiated the practice of countercyclical monetary policy, and that economic cycles have tightened during the post-Volcker era.

Suggested Citation

  • Jamilov, Rustam, 2011. "The federal funds rate in the post-Volcker era: evidence from Basic VAR," MPRA Paper 32499, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:32499
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/32499/1/MPRA_paper_32499.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-921, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kui-Wai Li, 2013. "The US monetary performance prior to the 2008 crisis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(24), pages 3450-3461, August.
    2. Evans, Charles L. & Marshall, David A., 2007. "Economic determinants of the nominal treasury yield curve," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 1986-2003, October.
    3. Filippo Occhino, 2001. "Monetary Policy Shocks in an Economy with Segmented Markets," Departmental Working Papers 200108, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    4. Brissimis, Sophocles N. & Kamberoglou, Nicos C. & Simigiannis, George T., 2001. "Is there a bank lending channel of monetary policy in Greece? Evidence from bank level data," Working Paper Series 104, European Central Bank.
    5. Francisco de Castro, 2006. "The macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy in Spain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 913-924.
    6. Jamie Armour & Walter Engert & Ben Fung, 1996. "Overnight Rate Innovations as a measure of monetary Policy Shocks in Vector Autoregressions," Staff Working Papers 96-4, Bank of Canada.
    7. Lloyd, S. P., 2017. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and the Interest Rate Channel: Signalling and Portfolio Rebalancing," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1735, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Agiakloglou, Christos & Gkouvakis, Michail, 2015. "Causal interrelations among market fundamentals: Evidence from the European Telecommunications sector," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 150-159.
    9. Xavier Ragot, 2005. "A theory of low inflation in a non Ricardian economy with credit constraints," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590788, HAL.
    10. Croushore, Dean & Evans, Charles L., 2006. "Data revisions and the identification of monetary policy shocks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(6), pages 1135-1160, September.
    11. Chetan Dave & Scott J. Dressler & Lei Zhang, 2020. "Bank Lending, Monetary Policy Transmission, and Interest on Excess Reserves: a FAVAR Analysis," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 44, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    12. Jose A. Zabala & Maria A. Prats, 2020. "The unconventional monetary policy of the European Central Bank: Effectiveness and transmission analysis," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 794-809, March.
    13. Virginie Coudert & Benoît Mojon, 1997. "Asymétries financières et transmission de la politique monétaire en Europe," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 128(2), pages 41-60.
    14. Dickinson, David & Liu, Jia, 2007. "The real effects of monetary policy in China: An empirical analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 87-111.
    15. Fan, Longzhen & Yu, Yihong & Zhang, Chu, 2011. "An empirical evaluation of China's monetary policies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 358-371, June.
    16. Gordon, David B & Leeper, Eric M, 1994. "The Dynamic Impacts of Monetary Policy: An Exercise in Tentative Identification," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1228-1247, December.
    17. Jean Boivin & Marc P. Giannoni, 2006. "Has Monetary Policy Become More Effective?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 445-462, August.
    18. Andrés Felipe Londoño & Jorge Andrés Tamayo & Carlos Alberto Velásquez, 2012. "Dinámica de la política monetaria e inflación objetivo en Colombia: una aproximación FAVAR," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 30(68), pages 14-71, June.
    19. Daniel Paravisini & Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2015. "Dissecting the Effect of Credit Supply on Trade: Evidence from Matched Credit-Export Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 333-359.
    20. Karen Cabos & Nikolaus Siegfried, 2004. "Controlling inflation in Euroland," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 549-558.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Federal Funds Rate; Bernanke and Blinder; Basic VAR; Funds Rate Exogeneity; Monetary Transmissions; Post-Volcker; Pre-Volcker;

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:32499. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.