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Warum sind manche Individuen und Länder protektionistischer als andere?
[Why Are Some People and Countries More Protectionist than Others?]

Author

Listed:
  • Teng, Faxin

Abstract

This paper is a summary of the case studies about the question: why are some people and countries more protectionist than others? Some economist (Rodrik, O’Rouke and Pasadilla et al.) have studied it with econometric analysis. After studying with some data sets they find out that: gender, social class, region, education, skill level, work sector, national pride are significant factors by the attitude building to free trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Teng, Faxin, 2008. "Warum sind manche Individuen und Länder protektionistischer als andere?
    [Why Are Some People and Countries More Protectionist than Others?]
    ," MPRA Paper 31958, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31958
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/31958/1/MPRA_paper_31958.pdf
    File Function: original version
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1994. "Protection for Sale," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 833-850, September.
    2. Bruce A. Blonigen & Robert C. Feenstra, 1997. "Protectionist Threats and Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Chapters,in: The Effects of U.S. Trade Protection and Promotion Policies, pages 55-80 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kevin O'Rourke, 2003. "Heckscher-Ohlin Theory and Individual Attitudes Towards Globalization," NBER Working Papers 9872, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Wood, Adrian, 1997. "Openness and Wage Inequality in Developing Countries: The Latin American Challenge to East Asian Conventional Wisdom," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 33-57, January.
    5. Scheve, Kenneth F. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2001. "What determines individual trade-policy preferences?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 267-292, August.
    6. Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2002. "Globalization and Inequality: Historical Trends," Aussenwirtschaft, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research, vol. 57(01), pages 65-104, March.
    7. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    8. Feenstra, R.C. & Hanson, G.H., 1995. "Foreign Investment, Outsourcing and Relative Wages," Papers 95-14, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
    9. Donald R. Davis, 1996. "Trade Liberalization and Income Distribution," NBER Working Papers 5693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj & Taylor, Alan M., 2006. "Democracy and Protectionism," CEPR Discussion Papers 5698, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. K. H. O'Rourke & R. Sinnott, 2001. "The Determinants of Individual Trade Policy Preferences: International Survey Evidence," CEG Working Papers 20016, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    12. Eugene Beaulieu & Michael Benarroch & James D. Gaisford, 2011. "Intra‐industry Trade Liberalization: Why Skilled Workers are More Likely to Support Free Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 579-594, August.
    13. Liao, Christine Marie & Pasadilla, Gloria O., 2004. "Determinants of Individual Trade Policy Preference in the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2004-16, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    14. Edward J. Balistreri, 1997. "The Performance of the Heckscher-Ohlin-Vanek Model in Predicting Endogenous Policy Forces at the Individual Level," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(1), pages 1-17, February.
    15. Paul A. Samuelson, 2004. "Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 135-146, Summer.
    16. Donald J. Robbins, 1996. "Evidence on Trade and Wages in the Developing World," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 119, OECD Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade preference; trade policy; political economy;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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