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Some Unexplored Economics of Roaming Child Workers

Author

Listed:
  • Amit, Kundu
  • Anwesha, Das

Abstract

Within the net of child labour, there is a section of children who live their lives on the streets, without any kind of attachment with their family and maintain their livelihood through working as informal child workers. This study is based on these children who are termed here as ‘Roaming child workers’. It came out that apart from poverty of the parents there are other socio-economic reasons which force a child to come out from the family and work as child worker in the urban areas. It also came out from field survey that after leaving home a good number of children are economically better off and even able to keep themselves above the poverty line. But still they are very vulnerable. Through this study, effort has been made to prove that average monthly expenditure on substances of these ‘Roaming working children’ increases at a decreasing rate with their average monthly income, whereas, average monthly expenditure on entertainment shares a linear relationship with average monthly income.

Suggested Citation

  • Amit, Kundu & Anwesha, Das, 2010. "Some Unexplored Economics of Roaming Child Workers," MPRA Paper 23593, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Jun 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23593
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/23593/1/MPRA_paper_23593.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
    2. Dessy, Sylvain E., 2000. "A defense of compulsive measures against child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 261-275, June.
    3. Saqib Jafarey & Sajal Lahiri, 2001. "Child Labour," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 2(1), pages 69-93, January.
    4. Kaushik Basu & Zafiris Tzannatos, 2003. "The Global Child Labor Problem: What Do We Know and What Can We Do?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 147-173, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child Labour; Poverty and Consumption Pattern;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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