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Micro and macro indicators of competition: comparison and relation with productivity change

Author

Listed:
  • Polder, Michael
  • Veldhuizen, Erik
  • Bergen, Dirk van den
  • Pijll, Eugène van der

Abstract

This paper investigates competition in the Dutch manufacturing sector. We look at various indicators that have been used throughout the literature and relate these to productivity growth. Moreover, where possible, the indicators and productivity growth are calculated at both the firm and industry level. This enables us to investigate differences in competition and in its relation with productivity for both aggregation levels. Our results indicate that contemporaneous competition is associated with lower productivity, while lagged competition is positively associated with productivity. This finding is consistent between micro and macro, and robust over the various indicators and industries. The results are consistent with the idea that firms first experience negative effects of changes in competition and need time to adjust, while in the period after adjustment productivity rises again.

Suggested Citation

  • Polder, Michael & Veldhuizen, Erik & Bergen, Dirk van den & Pijll, Eugène van der, 2009. "Micro and macro indicators of competition: comparison and relation with productivity change," MPRA Paper 18898, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18898
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18898/1/MPRA_paper_18898.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Nick Bloom & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt, 2005. "Competition and Innovation: an Inverted-U Relationship," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 701-728.
    2. Henry van der Wiel & Harold Creusen, 2008. "Cross your border and look around," CPB Document 170, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Harold Creusen & Bert Minne & Henry van der Wiel, 2006. "Measuring competition in the Netherlands," CPB Memorandum 163, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    4. P. Mohnen & F. Palm & S. Loeff & A. Tiwari, 2008. "Financial Constraints and Other Obstacles: are they a Threat to Innovation Activity?," De Economist, Springer, vol. 156(2), pages 201-214, June.
    5. Harold Creusen & Björn Vroomen & Henry van der Wiel & Fred Kuypers, 2006. "Dutch retail trade on the rise? Relation between competition, innovation and productivity," CPB Document 137, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Boone, J. & van Ours, J.C. & van der Wiel, H.P., 2007. "How (Not) to Measure Competition," Discussion Paper 2007-32, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    7. Bert M. Balk, 2007. "Measuring Productivity Change without Neoclassical Assumptions: A Conceptual Analysis," CEPA Working Papers Series WP042007, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    8. Nickell, Stephen J, 1996. "Competition and Corporate Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 724-746, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. João Amador & Ana Cristina Soares, 2012. "Competition in the Portuguese economy: Insights from a profit elasticity approach," Working Papers w201217, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    2. Ana Cristina Soares & João Amador, 2012. "Competition in the Portuguese Economy:An overview of classical indicators," Working Papers w201208, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    3. Michael Polder & Erik Veldhuizen, 2012. "Innovation and Competition in the Netherlands: Testing the Inverted-U for Industries and Firms," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 67-91, March.
    4. João Amador & Ana Cristina Soares, 2012. "Measuring competition in the Portuguese economy using profit elasticities," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    competition; productivity change; growth accounts; Production Statistics; micro-macro;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design

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