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A note on US excess bank reserves and the credit contraction

Author

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  • Khemraj, Tarron

Abstract

This paper reports aggregate bank excess liquidity preference curves for the pre-crisis and crisis periods. It is argued that the flat curve reflects a threshold lending rate at which point banks accumulate reserves passively. Moreover, the expansion of reserves – when the lending rate threshold is binding – does not lead to credit expansion. The latter would require policies that directly increase the demand for loans, particularly by the business sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Khemraj, Tarron, 2009. "A note on US excess bank reserves and the credit contraction," MPRA Paper 18702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18702
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18702/1/MPRA_paper_18702.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Todd Keister & James J. McAndrews, 2009. "Why are banks holding so many excess reserves?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 15(Dec).
    2. Edlin Aaron S. & Jaffee Dwight M., 2009. "Show Me The Money," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 6(4), pages 1-5, March.
    3. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Aizenman, Joshua & Hoffmaister, Alexander W., 2004. "The credit crunch in East Asia: what can bank excess liquid assets tell us?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 27-49, February.
    4. Hannan, Timothy H & Berger, Allen N, 1991. "The Rigidity of Prices: Evidence from the Banking Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 938-945, September.
    5. Todd Keister & Antoine Martin & James J. McAndrews, 2008. "Divorcing money from monetary policy," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Sep), pages 41-56.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank reserves; minimum loan interest rate; credit crunch;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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