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Monetary policy and bank behavior: Empirical evidence from India

  • Ghosh, Saibal

The paper develops an empirical model to explore the role that bank characteristics play in influencing the monetary transmission process. Employing data on Indian commercial banks for the period 1992-2004, the findings indicate that for banks classified according to size and capitalization, a monetary contraction lowers bank lending, although large and well-capitalized banks are able to shield their loan portfolio from monetary shocks.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 17395.

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Date of creation: Nov 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Economic and Political Weekly 10.41(2006): pp. 853-856
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17395
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  1. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "Monetary Policy and Corporate Behavior in India," IMF Working Papers 05/25, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Kashyap, Anil K & Stein, Jeremy C & Wilcox, David W, 1993. "Monetary Policy and Credit Conditions: Evidence from the Composition of External Finance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 78-98, March.
  3. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," NBER Working Papers 5146, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  5. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2000. "Fear of Floating," NBER Working Papers 7993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Favero, Carlo A. & Flabbi, Luca & Giavazzi, Francesco, 1999. "The Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy in Europe: Evidence from Banks' Balance Sheets," CEPR Discussion Papers 2303, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Nachane, D M & Narain, Aditya & Ghosh, Saibal & Sahoo, Satyananda, 2001. "Bank response to capital requirements: Theory and Indian evidence," MPRA Paper 17453, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
  9. Stephen D. Oliner & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1995. "Is there a bank lending channel for monetary policy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 1-20.
  10. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1995. "Bank lending and the transmission of monetary policy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 39, pages 47-79.
  11. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
  12. Taylor, John B, 2000. "Alternative Views of the Monetary Transmission Mechanism: What Difference Do They Make for Monetary Policy?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 60-73, Winter.
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