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What Sort of People Vote Expressively?

Author

Listed:
  • Alvin Etang

    () (Department of Economics, Yale University)

  • David Fielding

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

  • Stephen Knowles

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

Abstract

Using a survey and an experiment, we identify the personal characteristics associated with the difference between an individual's giving to charity and her vote in a referendum on charitable giving. Under certain circumstances, high levels of self-reported trust and happiness, and participation in social group activities, are associated with expressive voting for high levels of charitable giving. However, the sequencing of the experiments is of crucial importance. The 'warm glow' of expressive voting can influence subsequent individual decisions, and the 'cold shower' of individual selfishness can influence subsequent collective decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Alvin Etang & David Fielding & Stephen Knowles, 2011. "What Sort of People Vote Expressively?," Working Papers 1101, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1101
    as

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    File URL: http://www.otago.ac.nz/economics/research/otago076657.pdf
    File Function: This version, 2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eckel, Catherine C. & Grossman, Philip J., 1996. "Altruism in Anonymous Dictator Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 181-191, October.
    2. Tyran, Jean-Robert & Sausgruber, Rupert, 2006. "A little fairness may induce a lot of redistribution in democracy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 469-485, February.
    3. Jean-Robert Tyran & Alexander K. Wagner, 2016. "Experimental Evidence on Expressive Voting," Discussion Papers 16-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    4. Alvin Etang & David Fielding & Stephen Knowles, 2011. "Does trust extend beyond the village? Experimental trust and social distance in Cameroon," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 14(1), pages 15-35, March.
    5. Brennan,Geoffrey & Hamlin,Alan, 2000. "Democratic Devices and Desires," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521630207, April.
    6. Eckel, Catherine C. & Grossman, Philip J., 2003. "Rebate versus matching: does how we subsidize charitable contributions matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 681-701, March.
    7. Douglas Davis & Edward Millner & Robert Reilly, 2005. "Subsidy Schemes and Charitable Contributions: A Closer Look," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 8(2), pages 85-106, June.
    8. Bischoff, Ivo & Egbert, Henrik, 2008. "Bandwagon voting or false-consensus effect in voting experiments? First results and methodological limits," Discussion Papers 38, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
    9. Reiner Eichenberger & Felix Oberholzer-Gee, 1998. "Rational moralists: The role of fairness in democratic economic politics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 94(1), pages 191-210, January.
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