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Changes in New Zealand's Production Structure: An Input Output Analysis

This paper investigates changes in the production structure of the New Zealand economy using input output data. The analysis is undertaken at the 25-industry level using inter industry transactions for 1971-72, 1977-78, 1981-82, 1986-87, 1990-91 and 1994-95. Changes in the composition of gross output and value added are examined. Backward and forward linkages, indices of industry interconnectedness, a value added production multiplier, a cumulated primary input coefficient for compensation of employees and a measure of import content of final demand output are calculated, taking into account both direct and indirect transactions. The results suggest that some industries have been subject to large structural change and that a shift in New Zealand's pattern of industrial activity has occurred. These changes will have affected the transmission and propagation of shocks in the economy.

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Paper provided by New Zealand Treasury in its series Treasury Working Paper Series with number 03/01.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:03/01
Contact details of provider: Postal: New Zealand Treasury, PO Box 3724, Wellington, New Zealand
Phone: +64-4-472 2733
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  1. Robert A Buckle & David Haugh & Peter Thomson, 2001. "Calm after the Storm?: Supply-side contributions to New Zealand’s GDP volatility decline," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/33, New Zealand Treasury.
  2. Erwin Diewert & Denis Lawrence, 1999. "Measuring New Zealand’s Productivity," Treasury Working Paper Series 99/05, New Zealand Treasury.
  3. Iris Claus, 2002. "Inter industry linkages in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/09, New Zealand Treasury.
  4. Robert Dixon, 1996. "Inter-Industry Transactions and Input-Output Analysis," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 29(3), pages 327-336.
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