IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nub/occpap/20.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Broadcasting Productivity Growth in the UK

Author

Listed:

Abstract

In this study, we use enterprise-level data to calculate estimates of labour productivity growth in the UK broadcasting sector between 1999 and 2004 and TFP growth between 1998 and 2004. We present estimates using both gross output and gross value added. We also present TFP estimates separately for the TV and radio sectors and broken down by employment class size and also the decomposition of TFP into technical change and efficiency catch-up. All our estimates suggest that the broadcasting sector has experienced positive productivity growth over recent years. Productivity growth is found across the size distribution of firms. Technical change appears to have contributed most to productivity growth, although we also observe positive growth in efficiency catch-up. The finding of positive productivity growth over the period appears generally to be robust to alternative estimation procedures, to alternative price deflators (although this has an impact on the magnitude of the estimates) and to separate estimation of the TV and Radio sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2007. "Broadcasting Productivity Growth in the UK," Occasional Papers 20, Industrial Economics Division.
  • Handle: RePEc:nub:occpap:20
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/%7Elizecon/RePEc/pdf/20.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. ten Raa, Thijs & Wolff, Edward N., 2000. "Engines of growth in the US economy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 473-489, December.
    2. Almas Heshmati, 2003. "Productivity Growth, Efficiency and Outsourcing in Manufacturing and Service Industries," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 79-112, February.
    3. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Lichtenberg, Frank R & Siegel, Donald, 1991. "The Impact of R&D Investment on Productivity--New Evidence Using Linked R&D-LRD Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(2), pages 203-229, April.
    5. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    broadcasting; efficiency; productivity growth;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nub:occpap:20. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Robert Hoffmann). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ienotuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.