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Recent Marginal Labor Income Tax Rate Changes by Skill and Marital Status

  • Casey B. Mulligan

This paper calculates monthly time series for the overall safety net's statutory marginal labor income tax rate as a function of skill and marital status. Marginal tax rates increased significantly for all groups between 2007 and 2009, and dramatically so for unmarried household heads. The relationship between incentive changes and skill varies by marital status. Unemployment insurance and related expansions contribute to the patterns by skill while food stamp expansions contribute to the patterns by marital status. Remarkably, group changes in hours worked per capita line up with the statutory measures of incentive changes.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18426.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18426.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Publication status: published as Recent Marginal Labor Income Tax Rate Changes by Skill and Marital Status , Casey B. Mulligan. in Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 27 , Brown. 2013
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18426
Note: LS PE
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  1. Yelowitz, Aaron S, 1995. "The Medicaid Notch, Labor Supply, and Welfare Participation: Evidence from Eligibility Expansions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 909-39, November.
  2. Susan Dynarski & Judith Scott-Clayton & Mark Wiederspan, 2013. "Simplifying Tax Incentives and Aid for College: Progress and Prospects," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 161 - 202.
  3. Bruce D. Meyer & Wallace K. C. Mok & James X. Sullivan, 2009. "The Under-Reporting of Transfers in Household Surveys: Its Nature and Consequences," Working Papers 0903, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  4. repec:cbo:report:43421 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin & Michael Elsby, 2010. "The Labor Market in the Great Recession," 2010 Meeting Papers 323, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Martin Feldstein & Andrew Samwick, 1992. "Social Security Rules and Marginal Tax Rates," NBER Working Papers 3962, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Kyle F. Herkenhoff & Lee E. Ohanian, 2011. "Labor Market Dysfunction During the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 17313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. David H. Autor, 2011. "The Unsustainable Rise of the Disability Rolls in the United States: Causes, Consequences, and Policy Options," NBER Working Papers 17697, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Susan Dynarski & Judith Scott-Clayton & Mark Wiederspan, 2013. "Simplifying Tax Incentives and Aid for College: Progress and Prospects," NBER Working Papers 18707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gary Solon & Robert Barsky & Jonathan A. Parker, 1992. "Measuring the Cyclicality of Real Wages: How Important is Composition Bias," NBER Working Papers 4202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Kyle F. Herkenhoff & Lee Ohanian, 2012. "Foreclosure delay and U.S. unemployment," Working Papers 2012-017, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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