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The Value of Secure Property Rights: Evidence from Global Fisheries

  • Corbett A. Grainger
  • Christopher Costello

Property rights are commonly touted as a solution to common pool resource problems. But in practice the security of these property rights varies substantially owing to differences in design. In fisheries, the design of individual transferable quotas (ITQs) varies widely; the consequences of these design differences on economic outcomes has not been studied. To test whether the security of these property rights affects asset values, we compile a unique dataset to examine the relationship between the exclusivity of property rights and the dividend price ratios for ITQs. We find evidence that stronger property rights lead to higher asset values and lower dividend price ratios in ITQ fisheries. This pecuniary effect of property rights security informs the current policy debate on the design of property rights institutions for managing natural resources.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17019.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17019.

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Date of creation: May 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17019
Note: EEE
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  1. Homans, Frances R. & Wilen, James E., 1997. "A Model of Regulated Open Access Resource Use," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-21, January.
  2. Markus Goldstein & Christopher Udry, 2005. "The Profits of Power: Land Rights and Agricultural Investment in Ghana," Working Papers 929, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  3. Costello, Christopher J. & Kaffine, Daniel, 2008. "Natural resource use with limited-tenure property rights," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 20-36, January.
  4. Richard G. Newell & Kerry L. Papps & James N. Sanchirico, 2007. "Asset Pricing in Created Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 259-272.
  5. Grafton, R Quentin & Squires, Dale & Fox, Kevin J, 2000. "Private Property and Economic Efficiency: A Study of a Common-Pool Resource," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 679-713, October.
  6. Alston, Lee J & Libecap, Gary D & Schneider, Robert, 1996. "The Determinants and Impact of Property Rights: Land Titles on the Brazilian Frontier," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 25-61, April.
  7. Myles J. Watts & Jeffrey T. LaFrance, 1994. "Cows, Cowboys, and Controversy: The Grazing Fee Issue," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-24, Monash University, Department of Economics.
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