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Bankruptcy and Collateral in Debt Constrained Markets

  • Timothy J. Kehoe
  • David K. Levine

Typical models of bankruptcy and collateral rely on incomplete asset markets. In fact, bankruptcy and collateral add contingencies to asset markets. In some models, these contingencies can be used by consumers to achieve the same equilibrium allocations as in models with complete markets. In particular, the equilibrium allocation in the debt constrained model of Kehoe and Levine (2001) can be implemented in a model with bankruptcy and collateral. The equilibrium allocation is constrained efficient. Bankruptcy occurs when consumers receive low income shocks. The implementation of the debt constrained allocation in a model with bankruptcy and collateral is fragile in the sense of Leijonhufvud's "corridor of stability," however: If the environment changes, the equilibrium allocation is no longer constrained efficient.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12656.

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Date of creation: Oct 2006
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Publication status: published as Farmer, Roger E. A. (ed.) Macroeconomics in the Small and the Large: Essays on Microfoundations, Macroeconomic Applications, and Economic History in Honor of Axel Leijonhufvud. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12656
Note: EFG CF
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  1. William R. Zame, 1990. "Efficiency and the Role of Default When Security Markets are Incomplete," UCLA Economics Working Papers 585, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Timothy J. Kehoe & David K. Levine, 1992. "Debt constrained asset markets," Working Papers 445, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  3. Jaime Jose Orrillo Carhuajulca, 2000. "Default and Exogenous Collateral in Incomplete Markets with a Continuum of States," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1860, Econometric Society.
  4. Igor Livshits & James MacGee & Michele Tertilt, 2003. "Consumer bankruptcy: a fresh start," Working Papers 617, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. David M. Kreps, 1982. "Multiperiod Securities and the Efficient Allocation of Risk: A Comment on the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Information and Uncertainty, pages 203-232 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Dirk Krueger & Fabrizio Perri, 2006. "Does Income Inequality Lead to Consumption Inequality? Evidence and Theory -super-1," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 163-193.
  7. Felix Kubler & Karl Schmedders, 2001. "Stationary Equilibria in Asset-Pricing Models with Incomplete Markets and Collateral," Discussion Papers 1319, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  8. Duffie, J Darrell & Huang, Chi-fu, 1985. "Implementing Arrow-Debreu Equilibria by Continuous Trading of Few Long-lived Securities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1337-56, November.
  9. Aloisio Araujo & M�rio Rui P�scoa & Juan Pablo Torres-Mart�nez, 2002. "Collateral Avoids Ponzi Schemes in Incomplete Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1613-1638, July.
  10. Kehoe, Timothy J & Levine, David K, 2001. "Liquidity Constrained Markets versus Debt Constrained Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(3), pages 575-98, May.
  11. Satyajit Chatterjee & Dean Corbae & Makoto Nakajima & José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, 2007. "A Quantitative Theory of Unsecured Consumer Credit with Risk of Default," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(6), pages 1525-1589, November.
  12. Pradeep Dubey & John Geanakoplos & Martin Shubik, 1988. "Default and Efficiency in a General Equilibrium Model with Incomplete Markets," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 879R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Feb 1989.
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