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Financial Intermediary Capital

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  • Adriano A Rampini
  • S Viswanathan

Abstract

We propose a dynamic theory of financial intermediaries that are better able to collateralize claims than households, that is, have a collateralization advantage. Intermediaries require capital as they have to finance the additional amount that they can lend out of their own net worth. The net worth of financial intermediaries and the corporate sector are both state variables affecting the spread between intermediated and direct finance and the dynamics of real economic activity, such as investment, and financing. The accumulation of net worth of intermediaries is slow relative to that of the corporate sector. The model is consistent with key stylized facts about macroeconomic downturns associated with a credit crunch, namely, their severity, their protractedness, and the fact that the severity of the credit crunch itself affects the severity and persistence of downturns. The model captures the tentative and halting nature of recoveries from crises.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriano A Rampini & S Viswanathan, 2019. "Financial Intermediary Capital," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 86(1), pages 413-455.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:86:y:2019:i:1:p:413-455.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/restud/rdy020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. YiLi Chien & Hanno Lustig, 2010. "The Market Price of Aggregate Risk and the Wealth Distribution," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(4), pages 1596-1650, April.
    2. Gromb, Denis & Vayanos, Dimitri, 2002. "Equilibrium and welfare in markets with financially constrained arbitrageurs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 361-407.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "Recovery from Financial Crises: Evidence from 100 Episodes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 50-55, May.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2000. "A Theory of Bank Capital," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(6), pages 2431-2465, December.
    5. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    6. Timothy J. Kehoe & David K. Levine, 2008. "Bankruptcy and Collateral in Debt Constrained Markets," Chapters,in: Macroeconomics in the Small and the Large, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Martin & David Skeie & Ernst-Ludwig von Thadden, 2014. "Repo Runs," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(4), pages 957-989.
    2. Anderson, Nicola & Webber, Lewis & Noss, Joseph & Beale, Daniel & Crowley-Reidy, Liam, 2015. "Financial Stability Paper 34: The resilience of financial market liquidity," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 34, Bank of England.
    3. Carlos A. Arango & Oscar M. Valencia, 2015. "Macro-Prudential Policy under Moral Hazard and Financial Fragility," Borradores de Economia 878, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    4. Pietro Dindo & Andrea Modena & Loriana Pelizzon, 2019. "Risk Pooling, Leverage, and the Business Cycle," CESifo Working Paper Series 7772, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. René Aïd & Gilles Chemla & Arnaud Porchet & Nizar Touzi, 2011. "Hedging and Vertical Integration in Electricity Markets," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 57(8), pages 1438-1452, August.
    6. Hans Gersbach & Jean-Charles Rochet & Martin Scheffel, 2017. "Financial Intermediation, Capital Accumulation and Crisis Recovery," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 17-38, Swiss Finance Institute.
    7. Hamed Ghiaie, 2018. "Shadow Bank run, Housing and Credit Market: The Story of a Recession," THEMA Working Papers 2018-01, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    8. Josef Schroth, 2019. "Macroprudential policy with capital buffers," BIS Working Papers 771, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Chris Florackis & Alexandros Kontonikas & Alexandros Kostakis, 2010. "Transmission of macro-liquidity shocks to liquidity-sorted stock portfolios’ returns: The role of the financial crisis," Working Papers 2011_22, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Apr 2011.
    10. Rampini, Adriano A. & Viswanathan, S. & Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2019. "Risk Management in Financial Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 13787, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Jean-Sébastien Fontaine & René Garcia & Sermin Gungor, 2015. "Funding Liquidity, Market Liquidity and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns," Staff Working Papers 15-12, Bank of Canada.
    12. Carlos Arango & Oscar Valencia, 2015. "Macro-prudential Policies, Moral Hazard and Financial Fragility," IHEID Working Papers 06-2015, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    13. Florackis, Chris & Giorgioni, Gianluigi & Kostakis, Alexandros & Milas, Costas, 2014. "On stock market illiquidity and real-time GDP growth," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 210-229.
    14. Angeloni, Ignazio & Faia, Ester, 2013. "Capital regulation and monetary policy with fragile banks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 311-324.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Collateral; Financial intermediation; Financial constraints; Investment;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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