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Dividend Taxes and Firm Valuation: New Evidence

Author

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  • Alan J. Auerbach
  • Kevin A. Hassett

Abstract

This paper extends our previous analysis (Auerbach and Hassett 2005) of the effects of the "Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Act of 2003" on firm valuation. That paper found that firms with higher dividend yields benefited more than other dividend paying firms, a result that, in itself, is consistent with both new and traditional views of dividend taxation. But further evidence favored the new view. We also found that non-dividend-paying "immature" firms experienced larger abnormal returns than other firms and that a similar bonus accrued to firms likely to issue new shares, two results that are consistent with an anticipated transition to higher dividend payments. Here, we extend our earlier analysis in two ways. First, we consider the impact of the 2004 Presidential election on option prices, to gain further insight into and confirmation of the mechanism through which the 2003 legislation affected firm values. Second, we explore in more detail the determinants of the "immaturity premium" noted above. In contrast to claims in a recent paper by Amromin et al. (2005), we find that the premium is associated with the likelihood of new share issuance, as inferred but not demonstrated in our original analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan J. Auerbach & Kevin A. Hassett, 2006. "Dividend Taxes and Firm Valuation: New Evidence," NBER Working Papers 11959, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11959
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Raj Chetty & Emmanuel Saez, 2005. "Dividend Taxes and Corporate Behavior: Evidence from the 2003 Dividend Tax Cut," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(3), pages 791-833.
    2. Alan J. Auerbach & Kevin A. Hassett, 2005. "The 2003 Dividend Tax Cuts and the Value of the Firm: An Event Study," NBER Working Papers 11449, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kevin A. Hassett & Alan J. Auerbach, 2005. "The 2003 Dividend Tax Cuts and the Value of the Firm," AEI Economics Working Papers 49878, American Enterprise Institute.
    4. Gene Amromin & Paul Harrison & Steven Sharpe, 2008. "How Did the 2003 Dividend Tax Cut Affect Stock Prices?," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 625-646, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harry Huizinga & Johannes Voget & Wolf Wagner, 2014. "International Taxation and Cross-Border Banking," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 94-125, May.
    2. Alstadsæter, Annette & Jacob, Martin & Michaely, Roni, 2017. "Do dividend taxes affect corporate investment?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 74-83.
    3. Dackehag, Margareta & Hansson, Åsa, 2015. "Taxation of Dividend Income and Economic Growth: The Case of Europe," Working Papers 2015:24, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    4. Richard H. Fosberg, 2012. "The Corporate Effects of Personal Taxation," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 2(1), pages 1-8, February.
    5. Ing-Haw Cheng & Harrison Hong & Kelly Shue, 2013. "Do Managers Do Good with Other People's Money?," NBER Working Papers 19432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Annette Alstadsæter & Erik Fjærli, 2009. "Neutral taxation of shareholder income? Corporate responses to an announced dividend tax," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 571-604, August.
    7. Korinek, Anton & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2009. "Dividend taxation and intertemporal tax arbitrage," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 142-159, February.
    8. George M. von Furstenberg & Ulf von Kalckreuth, 2007. "Dependence on External Finance by Manufacturing Sector: Examining the Measure and its Properties," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 111, pages 55-80.
    9. Huizinga, Harry & Voget, Johannes & Wagner, Wolf, 2012. "Capital Gains Taxation and the Cost of Capital: Evidence from Unanticipated Cross-Border Transfers of Tax Bases," CEPR Discussion Papers 9151, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Gene Amromin & Paul Harrison & Steven Sharpe, 2008. "How Did the 2003 Dividend Tax Cut Affect Stock Prices?," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 625-646, December.
    11. Maier, Christoph & Schanz, Deborah, 2017. "Towards neutral distribution taxes and vanishing tax effects in the European Union," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 215, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.
    12. Ufuk Ince & James Owers, 2012. "The interaction of corporate dividend policy and capital structure decisions under differential tax regimes," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(1), pages 33-57, January.
    13. Conesa, Juan C. & Domínguez, Begoña, 2013. "Intangible investment and Ramsey capital taxation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(8), pages 983-995.
    14. Tomasz Skica & Tomasz Wo³owiec & Galya Gercheva, 2014. "Income Taxes, Public Fiscal Policy And Economic Growth," "e-Finanse", University of Information Technology and Management, Institute of Financial Research and Analysis, vol. 10(3), pages 52-64, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence

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