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Elementi di pensiero economico nello Stato commerciale chiuso di J. G. Fichte

Author

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  • Stefano Spalletti

    (University of Macerata)

Abstract

Questo scritto analizza i contributi dello Stato Commerciale Chiuso (1800) di Johann Gottlieb Fichte all'economia politica nel loro complesso. Presenta l'interpretazione del diritto di proprietà del filosofo tedesco come un a priori fondamentale del suo metodo economico. Quanto deriva da questa interpretazione - principalmente l'impianto di un'economia pianificata centralmente - appare il risultato di una costituzione economica "razionale" che perviene a un equilibrio di stampo socialista ma senza un calcolo economico esplicito. Il paper fornisce anche una nuova e diversa interpretazione dell'"anarchia dei mercati" di Fichte, riconducendola a un esito derivante dal "fallimento dei mercati" stessi. Questi argomenti vengono discussi, infine, in una prospettiva comportamentale che giustifica l'attenzione di Fichte verso gli stili economici (Wirtschaftsstil) quale caratteristica tipica della tradizione economica tedesca.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Spalletti, 2017. "Elementi di pensiero economico nello Stato commerciale chiuso di J. G. Fichte," Working Papers 49-2017, Macerata University, Department of Studies on Economic Development (DiSSE), revised Jun 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcr:wpaper:wpaper00049
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stili economici; Fichte; Fallimenti del mercato; Pianificazione; Diritto di proprietÃ;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B14 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Socialist; Marxist
    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • B51 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Socialist; Marxian; Sraffian

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