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Does Density Matter?

  • Peter Gordon Sanford Ikeda
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    Since World War II, economic and demographic forces, possibly along with the consequences of earlier housing and infrastructural policies, 1 has flattened the population - density gradient in metropolitan areas across the United States, while presumably reducing the vitality and dense social networks associated with most traditional city centers. In response, planning ideologies that are hostile to "unplanned", low - density development and that seek to promote high - density, pedestrian - and environmentally friendly communities have been developed to combat these trends. But do scholars who study cities even understand the nature of cities well enough to formulate policies that impact cities in a positive way?

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    File URL: http://lusk.usc.edu/sites/default/files/working_papers/DENSITY.pdf
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    Paper provided by USC Lusk Center for Real Estate in its series Working Paper with number 8957.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:luk:wpaper:8957
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    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko, 2001. "Urban Decline and Durable Housing," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1931, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Richard Voith, 1992. "City and suburban growth: substitutes or complements?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Sep, pages 21-33.
    3. Edward L. Glaeser & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2009. "The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States," NBER Working Papers 14806, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Wendell Cox & Peter Gordon & Christian L. Redfearn, 2008. "Highway Penetration of Central Cities: Not a Major Cause of Suburbanization," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 5(1), pages 32-45, January.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2001. "Decentralized Employment and the Transformation of the American City," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1912, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    6. Randall G. Holcombe, 2004. "The New Urbanism Versus the Market Process," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 17(2_3), pages 285-300, 06.
    7. Edward L. Glaeser, 1998. "Are Cities Dying?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 139-160, Spring.
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