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Labour Migration from Eastern Europe and the EU’s Quest for Talents

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  • Danzer, Alexander M.
  • Dietz, Barbara

Abstract

This article investigates the determinants of temporary migration and the destination choices of migrants from a geopolitically important region in eastern Europe that borders Russia and the enlarged EU. We present empirical evidence from a novel survey simultaneously conducted in Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine, five countries that share a common institutional and linguistic heritage with Russia. Temporary migrants from eastern Europe are less well educated than non-migrants. While the least educated migrants head for Russia, the higher educated move to the EU and the best educated to overseas destinations. According to unique information on pre-migration training courses, a non-negligible fraction of eastern European migrants to the EU is well-equipped with language skills and qualifications. However, since many labour migrants suffer from occupational downgrading or skill waste in the destination, the EU seems to fail in fully benefiting from the potential of eastern European migration despite the geographic proximity.

Suggested Citation

  • Danzer, Alexander M. & Dietz, Barbara, 2013. "Labour Migration from Eastern Europe and the EU’s Quest for Talents," Munich Reprints in Economics 20030, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:20030
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    2. Danzer, Alexander M. & Feuerbaum, Carsten & Gaessler, Fabian, 2020. "Labor Supply and Automation Innovation," IZA Discussion Papers 13429, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol, 2015. "In transit: The well-being of migrants from transition and post-transition countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 164-186.
    4. Sinem H. Ayhan & Kseniia Gatskova & Hartmut Lehmann, 2017. "The impact of non-cognitive skills and risk preferences on rural-to-urban migration: Evidence from Ukraine," Working Papers 369, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    5. Tani, Massimiliano, 2018. "Selective Immigration, Occupational Licensing, and Labour Market Outcomes of Foreign-Trained Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11370, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Massimiliano Tani, 2021. "Occupational Licensing and the Skills Mismatch of Highly Educated Migrants," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 59(3), pages 730-756, September.
    7. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2016. "Gender Dimensions of Inequality in the Countries of Central Asia, South Caucasus, and Western CIS," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_858, Levy Economics Institute.
    8. Christina Diane Bastianon, 2019. "Youth Migration Aspirations in Georgia and Moldova," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 16(1), pages 105-121, January.
    9. Tani, Massimiliano, 2018. "Selective immigration policies, occupational licensing, and the quality of migrants’ education-occupation match," GLO Discussion Paper Series 206, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. Michael Fertig & Martin Kahanec, 2015. "Projections of potential flows to the enlarging EU from Ukraine, Croatia and other Eastern neighbors," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, December.
    11. Milena Nikolova, 2015. "Migrant well-being after leaving transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 195-195, October.
    12. Konara, Palitha, 2020. "The role of language connectedness in reducing home bias in trade, investment, information, and people flows," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    13. Ayhan, Sinem H. & Gatskova, Kseniia & Lehmann, Hartmut, 2020. "The impact of non-cognitive skills and risk preferences on rural-to-urban migration in Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 144-162.

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