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Globalization

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Abstract

This paper looks at some aspect of globalisation. After a discussion on its definition, the first part highlights historical evolution of globalisation in its major components (trade flows, foreign direct investments, portfolio movements and migration). The evidence shows that (1) globalisation its not new; (2) it is not irreversible; (3) the new elements in the last phase of globalisation are the low international mobility of labour, the changes in trade policy, the relevance in financial capita movement and their role in financial crisis. In the second part, the paper shows how poverty has not increased around the world (even if its level reaches dimension requiring a humanitarian attention). Inequality around the world is increased in the last two hundred years with an inversion in its trend in the last twenty years. In the third part, the paper analyses the role of economic actors at the international level. The problem of accountability and representatively both of governmental and non governmental organisation is analysed. A short guide to information available on the web closes the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca De Benedictis & Rodolfo Helg, 2002. "Globalization," LIUC Papers in Economics 112, Cattaneo University (LIUC).
  • Handle: RePEc:liu:liucec:112
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    Cited by:

    1. Athanasios Lapatinas, 2015. "Multinational versus National Firms on Labour Adjustment Costs: A Structural Approach," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 427-441, December.
    2. Rosario Crinò, 2007. "Offshoring, Multinationals and Labor Market: A Review of the Empirical Literature," KITeS Working Papers 196, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Jan 2007.
    3. Lichter, Andreas & Peichl, Andreas & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2015. "The own-wage elasticity of labor demand: A meta-regression analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 94-119.
    4. Ellen Brock & Sabien Dobbelaere, 2006. "Has International Trade Affected Workers’ Bargaining Power?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(2), pages 233-266, July.
    5. Fay Dunkerley & Amihai Glazer & Stef Proost, 2010. "What Drives Gasoline Prices?," Working Papers 091005, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    6. Vallanti, Giovanna, 2005. "Capital mobility and unemployment dynamics: evidence from a panel of OECD countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19897, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Giorgio Barba Navaretti & Daniele Checchi & Alessandro Turrini, 2003. "Adjusting Labor Demand: Multinational Versus National Firms: A Cross-European Analysis," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 708-719, 04/05.
    8. Hijzen, Alexander & Swaim, Paul, 2010. "Offshoring, labour market institutions and the elasticity of labour demand," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 1016-1034, November.
    9. Giovanna Vallanti, 2015. "International Capital Mobility and Unemployment Dynamics: Empirical Evidence from OECD Countries," Working Papers LuissLab 15123, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    10. Michael Gasiorek, 2007. "Determinants of Productivity in Morocco: The Role of Trade?," Working Papers 716, Economic Research Forum, revised 01 Jan 2007.
    11. Aretz, Bodo & Busl, Claudia & Gürtzgen, Nicole & Hogrefe, Jan & Kappler, Marcus & Steffes, Susanne & Westerheide, Peter, 2009. "Endbericht zum Forschungsauftrag fe 13/08: "Ursachenanalyse der Verschiebung in der funktionalen Einkommensverteilung in Deutschland" (Aktenzeichen I A 3 - Vw 3170/08/10035)," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research, number 110510, May.

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