IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lev/wrkpap/wp_843.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Is a Very High Public Debt a Problem?

Author

Listed:
  • Pedro Leao

Abstract

This paper has two main objectives. The first is to propose a policy architecture that can prevent a very high public debt from resulting in a high tax burden, a government default, or inflation. The second objective is to show that government deficits do not face a financing problem. After these deficits are initially financed through the net creation of base money, the private sector necessarily realizes savings, in the form of either government bond purchases or, if a default is feared, "acquisitions" of new money.

Suggested Citation

  • Pedro Leao, 2015. "Is a Very High Public Debt a Problem?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_843, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_843
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_843.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Smithin, 2007. "A real interest rate rule for monetary policy?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 101-118.
    2. Thomas I. Palley, 2015. "Money, Fiscal Policy, and Interest Rates: A Critique of Modern Monetary Theory," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 1-23, January.
    3. Eric Tymoigne & L. Randall Wray, 2013. "Modern Money Theory 101: A Reply to Critics," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_778, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2010. "The return of fiscal policy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 327-346, April.
    5. Mathew Forstater, 1999. "Functional Finance and Full Employment: Lessons from Lerner for Today," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_272, Levy Economics Institute.
    6. Mathew Forstater, 1999. "Functional Finance and Full Employment: Lessons from Lerner for Today," Macroeconomics 9908002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Claude Gnos & Louis-Philippe Rochon, 2006. "Post-Keynesian Principles of Economic Policy," Post-Print halshs-00114699, HAL.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal Policy; Functional Finance; Modern Monetary Theory; Monetary Policy; Public Debt Sustainability; Zero Interest Rates;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_843. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elizabeth Dunn). General contact details of provider: http://www.levyinstitute.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.