IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lev/wrkpap/wp_778.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Modern Money Theory 101: A Reply to Critics

Author

Listed:
  • Eric Tymoigne
  • L. Randall Wray

Abstract

One of the main contributions of Modern Money Theory (MMT) has been to explain why monetarily sovereign governments have a very flexible policy space that is unencumbered by hard financial constraints. Through a detailed analysis of the institutions and practices surrounding the fiscal and monetary operations of the treasury and central bank of many nations, MMT has provided institutional and theoretical insights about the inner workings of economies with monetarily sovereign and nonsovereign governments. MMT has also provided policy insights with respect to financial stability, price stability, and full employment. As one may expect, several authors have been quite critical of MMT. Critiques of MMT can be grouped into five categories: views about the origins of money and the role of taxes in the acceptance of government currency, views about fiscal policy, views about monetary policy, the relevance of MMT conclusions for developing economies, and the validity of the policy recommendations of MMT. This paper addresses the critiques raised using the circuit approach and national accounting identities, and by progressively adding additional economic sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Tymoigne & L. Randall Wray, 2013. "Modern Money Theory 101: A Reply to Critics," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_778, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_778
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_778.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Louis-Philippe Rochon & Matias Vernengo & Louis-Philippe Rochon & Matias Vernengo, 2003. "State money and the real world: or chartalism and its discontents," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 57-67.
    2. Claude Gnos & Louis-Philippe Rochon, 2002. "Money Creation and the State : A Critical Assessment of Chartalism," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 41-57.
    3. Marc Lavoie, 2013. "The Monetary and Fiscal Nexus of Neo-Chartalism: A Friendly Critique," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 1-32.
    4. Thomas I. Palley, 2015. "Money, Fiscal Policy, and Interest Rates: A Critique of Modern Monetary Theory," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 1-23, January.
    5. Milton H. Marquis, 2002. "Setting the interest rate," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue oct11.
    6. Marco Bassetto & Todd Messer, 2013. "Fiscal Consequences of Paying Interest on Reserves," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34, pages 413-436, December.
    7. Hassan Bougrine & Mario Seccareccia, 2002. "Money, Taxes, Public Spending, and the State Within a Circuitist Perspective," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 58-79.
    8. Stephanie Bell & L. Randall Wray, 2002. "Fiscal effects on reserves and the independence of the Fed," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(2), pages 263-271.
    9. Eric Tymoigne, 2014. "Modern Money Theory, and Interrelations Between the Treasury and Central Bank: The Case of the United States," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(3), pages 641-662.
    10. William Mitchell & Joan Muysken, 2010. "Full employment abandoned: shifting sands and policy failures," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(4), pages 295-313.
    11. Scott T. Fullwiler, 2006. "Setting interest rates in the modern money era," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 496-525.
    12. Ann-Marie Meulendyke, 1998. "U.S. monetary policy and financial markets," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, number 1998mpaf, September.
    13. Alain Parguez, 1999. "The Expected Failure of the European Economic and Monetary Union: A False Money against the Real Economy," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 63-76, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thomas I. Palley, 2014. "The theory of global imbalances: mainstream economics vs. structural Keynesianism," IMK Working Paper 136-2014, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    2. repec:bla:ecaffa:v:37:y:2017:i:2:p:197-212 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Tianhao Zhi, 2016. "Animal Spirits and Financial Instability - A Disequilibrium Macroeconomic Perspective," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 28, january-d.
    4. Thomas I. Palley, 2015. "The Critics of Modern Money Theory (MMT) are Right," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 45-61, January.
    5. Eric Tymoigne & L. Randall Wray, 2015. "Modern Money Theory: A Reply to Palley," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 24-44, January.
    6. repec:mes:postke:v:39:y:2016:i:1:p:44-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Pedro Leao, 2015. "Is a Very High Public Debt a Problem?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_843, Levy Economics Institute.
    8. Tianhao Zhi, 2015. "A Critique of Modern Money Theory and the Disequilibrium Dynamics of Banking and Government Finance," Working Paper Series 184, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Modern Money Theory; Price Stability; Full Employment; Financial Stability; Money;

    JEL classification:

    • B5 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches
    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • E11 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Marxian; Sraffian; Kaleckian
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_778. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elizabeth Dunn). General contact details of provider: http://www.levyinstitute.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.