IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Distribution of Economic Resources: Implications of Including the Household Production


  • Jens Bonke

    (Institute of Economics, University of Copenhagen)


The value of household production is estimated to 40-50 percent of GNP in most western countries, and because the distribution of this income-in-kind is different from ordinary income distribution, the concept of economic well-being may include household production. The monetary value of household production is evaluated by a market alternative principle and an opportunity-cost principle. In the last case a reservation wage is estimated, and integrated in a modified opportunity principle, which means that household work of non-working women is evaluated by the reservation wage, and household work of working women and men by their wage-rate. The conclusions are among others, that the inclusion of household production reduces the inequality, and that women's contributions--money income and household production--functions as income equalizers.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Bonke, 1991. "Distribution of Economic Resources: Implications of Including the Household Production," Discussion Papers 91-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:9110

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sen, Partha & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1990. "Investment tax credit in an open economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 277-299, August.
    2. Hall, Robert E, 1988. "Intertemporal Substitution in Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 339-357, April.
    3. Anne C. Sibert, 1985. "Capital Accumulation and Foreign Investment Taxation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 331-345.
    4. Gordon, Roger H, 1986. "Taxation of Investment and Savings in a World Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1086-1102, December.
    5. Mutti, John & Grubert, Harry, 1985. "The taxation of capital income in an open economy: the importance of resident-nonresident tax treatment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 291-309, August.
    6. Bovenberg, A.L., 1986. "Capital income taxation in growing open economies," Other publications TiSEM d92d32f6-df9f-418b-bbd3-d, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    7. Lawrence H. Goulder & John B. Shoven & John Whalley, 1983. "Domestic Tax Policy and the Foreign Sector: The Importance of Alternative Foreign Sector Formulations to Results from a General Equilibrium Tax Analysis Model," NBER Chapters,in: Behavioral Simulation Methods in Tax Policy Analysis, pages 333-368 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Keuschnigg, Christian, 1994. "Dynamic tax incidence and intergenerationally neutral reform," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 343-366, February.
    9. Bovenberg, A. Lans, 1986. "Capital income taxation in growing open economies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 347-376, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    national income accounts; households; income; Denmark; U.S.; Netherlands;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:9110. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Hoffmann). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.