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Lessons from the Danish Ban on Feed-Grade Antibiotics


  • Hayes, Dermot J.
  • Jensen, Helen H.


Recent experiences in Denmark provide some comparable evidence on the effects of a ban on antibiotics in feed for hog production. A ban in the United States would increase costs by nearly $4.50 per animal in the first year, and, as in Denmark, raise significant issues with respect to animal health, especially at the post-weaning stage.

Suggested Citation

  • Hayes, Dermot J. & Jensen, Helen H., 2003. "Lessons from the Danish Ban on Feed-Grade Antibiotics," Staff General Research Papers Archive 11284, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:11284

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard E. Just & Quinn Weninger, 1999. "Are Crop Yields Normally Distributed?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 287-304.
    2. Babcock, Bruce A. & Blackmer, A. M., 1992. "Value of Reducing Temporal Input Nonuniformities (The)," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10587, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Bruce A. Babcock & David A. Hennessy, 1996. "Input Demand under Yield and Revenue Insurance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 416-427.
    4. Babcock, Bruce A. & Blackmer, Alfred M., 1992. "The Value Of Reducing Temporal Input Nonuniformities," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 17(02), December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Norwood Bailey & Lusk Jayson L, 2005. "Instrument-Induced Bias in Donation Mechanisms: Evidence from the Field," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-26, December.
    2. Tina L. Saitone & Richard J. Sexton & Daniel A. Sumner, 2015. "What Happens When Food Marketers Require Restrictive Farming Practices?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(4), pages 1021-1043.
    3. repec:oup:erevae:v:44:y:2017:i:4:p:634-657. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Michael G. Hogberg & Kellie Curry Raper & James F. Oehmke, 2009. "Banning subtherapeutic antibiotics in U.S. swine production: a simulation of impacts on industry structure," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 314-330.

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