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Growth or Glamour? Fundamentals and Systematic Risk in Stock Returns

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  • Polk, Christopher
  • Vuolteenaho, Tuomo
  • Campbell, John Y.

Abstract

The cash flows of growth stocks are particularly sensitive to temporary movements in aggregate stock prices, driven by shocks to market discount rates, while the cash flows of value stocks are particularly sensitive to permanent movements, driven by shocks to aggregate cash flows. Thus, the high betas of growth (value) stocks with the market's discount-rate (cash-flow) shocks are determined by the cash-flow fundamentals of growth and value companies. Growth stocks are not merely “glamour stocks†whose systematic risks are purely driven by investor sentiment. More generally, the systematic risks of individual stocks with similar accounting characteristics are primarily driven by the systematic risks of their fundamentals.growth and value companies. Growth stocks are not merely "glamour stocks" whose systematic risks are purely driven by investor sentiment. More generally, accounting measures of firm-level risk have predictive power for firm's betas with market-wide cash flows, and this predictive power arises from the behavior of firm's cash flows. The systematic risks of stocks with similar accounting characteristics are primarily driven by the systematic risks of their fundamentals.

Suggested Citation

  • Polk, Christopher & Vuolteenaho, Tuomo & Campbell, John Y., 2010. "Growth or Glamour? Fundamentals and Systematic Risk in Stock Returns," Scholarly Articles 9887622, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:9887622
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • N22 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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