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The Regression Discontinuity Design — Theory and Applications

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  • Lemieux, Thomas
  • Imbens, Guido

Abstract

In Regression Discontinuity (RD) designs for evaluating causal effects of interventions, assignment to a treatment is determined at least partly by the value of an observed covariate lying on either side of a fixed threshold. These designs were first introduced in the evaluation literature by Thistlewaite and Campbell (1960). With the exception of a few unpublished theoretical papers, these methods did not attract much attention in the economics literature until recently. Starting in the late 1990s, there has been a large number of studies in economics applying and extending RD methods. In this paper we review some of the practical and theoretical issues involved in the implementation of RD methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Lemieux, Thomas & Imbens, Guido, 2008. "The Regression Discontinuity Design — Theory and Applications," Scholarly Articles 3043411, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:3043411
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    File URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/3043411/imbens_regresh.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Yogesh Uppal, 2010. "Estimating Incumbency Effects In U.S. State Legislatures: A Quasi-Experimental Study," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 180-199, July.
    2. Freier, Ronny & Odendahl, Christian, 2015. "Do parties matter? Estimating the effect of political power in multi-party systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 310-328.
    3. d׳Hombres, Béatrice & Nunziata, Luca, 2016. "Wish you were here? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effect of education on self-reported attitude toward immigrants," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 201-224.
    4. Hymel, Kent, 2014. "Do parking fees affect retail sales? Evidence from Starbucks," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 221-233.
    5. Andrew Kerner & Morten Jerven & Alison Beatty, 2017. "Does it pay to be poor? Testing for systematically underreported GNI estimates," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-38, March.
    6. Daniel Zaga, 2014. "The Impact of Three Mexican Nutritional Programs: The Case of Dif-Puebla," CFD Working Papers 09-2015, Centre for Finance and Development, The Graduate Institute.

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