IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Household-level Recovery after Floods in a Developing Country: Evidence from Pakistan

  • Kurosaki, Takashi
Registered author(s):

    Based on a panel survey conducted in rural Pakistan, this paper analyzes the extent to which households recovered from damage due to floods that hit the country in 2010. With regard to initial recovery, households who had initially fewer assets and were hit by greater flood damage had more difficulty in recovering. After one year, the overall recovery had improved, with initially rich households associated with faster recovery but the speed of recovery decelerated. The overall pattern indicates that the village economy was turning towards the initial asset distribution despite the short-run disturbance to the household economy.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series CEI Working Paper Series with number 2012-08.

    in new window

    Length: 35, 13 p.
    Date of creation: Nov 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2012-08
    Note: November 2012
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 2-1 Naka, Kunitachi, Tokyo 186-8603
    Phone: 042-580-8405
    Fax: 042-580-8333
    Web page:

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. James E. Foster & Indranil Dutta & Ajit Mishra, 2010. "On Measuring Vulnerability to Poverty," Working Papers 2010-13, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Ethan Ligon & Laura Schechter, 2003. "Measuring Vulnerability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages C95-C102, March.
    3. Coffman, Makena & Noy, Ilan, 2012. "Hurricane Iniki: measuring the long-term economic impact of a natural disaster using synthetic control," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(02), pages 187-205, April.
    4. Jayne, Thomas S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2002. "Targeting of food aid in rural Ethiopia: chronic need or inertia?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 247-288, August.
    5. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "Targeting Cyclone Relief within the Village: Kinship, Sharing, and Capture," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 387 - 416.
    6. Takashi Kurosaki, 2006. "Consumption vulnerability to risk in rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 70-89.
    7. Ilan Noy, 2007. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Disasters," Working Papers 200707, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    8. Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2006. "The Impact of Natural and Manmade Disasters on Household Welfare," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25750, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Morris, Saul S. & Wodon, Quentin, 2003. "The Allocation of Natural Disaster Relief Funds: Hurricane Mitch in Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1279-1289, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2012-08. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Reiko Suzuki)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.