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Household-level Recovery after Floods in a Developing Country: Evidence from Pakistan

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  • Kurosaki, Takashi

Abstract

Based on a panel survey conducted in rural Pakistan, this paper analyzes the extent to which households recovered from damage due to floods that hit the country in 2010. With regard to initial recovery, households who had initially fewer assets and were hit by greater flood damage had more difficulty in recovering. After one year, the overall recovery had improved, with initially rich households associated with faster recovery but the speed of recovery decelerated. The overall pattern indicates that the village economy was turning towards the initial asset distribution despite the short-run disturbance to the household economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Kurosaki, Takashi, 2012. "Household-level Recovery after Floods in a Developing Country: Evidence from Pakistan," CEI Working Paper Series 2012-08, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2012-08
    Note: November 2012
    as

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/28440/1/wp2012-8.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Takashi Kurosaki, 2006. "Consumption vulnerability to risk in rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 70-89.
    2. Noy, Ilan, 2009. "The macroeconomic consequences of disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 221-231, March.
    3. Coffman, Makena & Noy, Ilan, 2012. "Hurricane Iniki: measuring the long-term economic impact of a natural disaster using synthetic control," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(02), pages 187-205, April.
    4. Jayne, Thomas S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2002. "Targeting of food aid in rural Ethiopia: chronic need or inertia?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 247-288, August.
    5. SAWADA Yasuyuki & Rima BHATTCHARYAY & KOTERA Tomoaki, 2011. "Aggregate Impacts of Natural and Man-made Disasters: A quantitative comparison," Discussion papers 11023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    6. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "Targeting Cyclone Relief within the Village: Kinship, Sharing, and Capture," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 387-416.
    7. Indranil Dutta & James Foster & Ajit Mishra, 2011. "On measuring vulnerability to poverty," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(4), pages 743-761, October.
    8. Yasuyuki Sawada, 2007. "The impact of natural and manmade disasters on household welfare," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 59-73, December.
    9. Ethan Ligon & Laura Schechter, 2003. "Measuring Vulnerability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 95-102, March.
    10. Morris, Saul S. & Wodon, Quentin, 2003. "The Allocation of Natural Disaster Relief Funds: Hurricane Mitch in Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1279-1289, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    natural disaster; recovery; resilience; Asia; Pakistan;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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