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Poverty, inequality and natural disasters – A survey

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  • Noy, Ilan
  • Karim, Azreen

Abstract

The last few years have seen an explosion of economic research on the consequences of natural disasters. This new interest is attributable first and foremost to a growing awareness of the potentially catastrophic nature of these events, but also a result of the increasing awareness that natural disasters are social and economic events: their impact is shaped as much by the structure and characteristics of the countries they hit as by their physical characteristics. Here, we survey the literature that examines the direct and indirect impact of natural disaster events specifically on the poor and their impact on the distribution of income within affected communities and societies. We also discuss some of the lacunae in this literature and outline a future agenda of investigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Noy, Ilan & Karim, Azreen, 2013. "Poverty, inequality and natural disasters – A survey," Working Paper Series 2974, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:vuw:vuwecf:2974
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    File URL: http://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/handle/10063/2974
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    Cited by:

    1. Noy, Ilan & Patel, Pooja, 2014. "Floods and spillovers: Households after the 2011 great flood in Thailand," Working Paper Series 3609, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. Mitrut, Andreea & Wolff, François-Charles, 2014. "Remittances after natural disasters: Evidence from the 2004 Indian tsunami," Working Papers in Economics 604, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    Natural disasters; Poverty; Income distribution;

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