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The labor market impact of refugee immigration in Sweden 1999–2007


  • Ruist, Joakim

    () (Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg)


This study estimates labor market effects of refugee immigration in Sweden 1999–2007. The setting is particularly suitable for using spatial variation within the country to estimate labor market effects of immigration. Bias from endogenous immigrant settlement is likely to be smaller when estimating the effect of only refugee immigration. Bias from internal migration of previous inhabitants is reduced by using data where the same individuals are identified over time. No significant effect of refugee immigration on total unemployment is found, but there is a large effect on the unemployment of previous immigrants from low- and middle-income countries, indicating that newly arrived refugee immigrants are substantially more easily substituted for this group than for natives in production.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruist, Joakim, 2013. "The labor market impact of refugee immigration in Sweden 1999–2007," SULCIS Working Papers 2013:1, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2013_001

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali Fakih & May Ibrahim, 2016. "The impact of Syrian refugees on the labor market in neighboring countries: empirical evidence from Jordan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 64-86, February.
    2. Weber, Enzo & Weigand, Roland, 2016. "Identifying macroeconomic effects of refugee migration to Germany," IAB Discussion Paper 201620, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. repec:mig:bcwpap:v:7:y:2017:i:1:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    unemployment; refugee immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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