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Estimating Distributional Effects of Environmental Policy in Swedish Coastal Environments – A Walk along different Socio-economic Dimensions

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    This paper studies distributional effects of environmental policies in Swedish coastal environments, in monetary and environmental quality terms, for different socio-economic groups. The study area is widely used for different recreational activities and has a mix of different visitors. Data comes from a choice experiment study. Some results confirm limited existing knowledge from previous research, although the ethnical dimension to a certain extent contradicts conventional perceptions. Based on previous research from other countries, the hypothesis would be that native Swedes would benefit more from environmental improvements than respondents with a non-Swedish background. Interestingly results differ, depending on the environmental amenity. For example, respondents with a non-Swedish origin benefit more, both in monetary and environmental quality terms, from reduced noise and littering compared to respondents with a Swedish origin. Also, independent of ethnical background, people use the area in a similar manner.

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    Paper provided by CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics in its series CERE Working Papers with number 2012:18.

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    Length: 41 pages
    Date of creation: 07 Dec 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:slucer:2012_018
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    1. Mark Morrison & Jeff Bennett & Russell Blamey & Jordan Louviere, 2002. "Choice Modeling and Tests of Benefit Transfer," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(1), pages 161-170.
    2. Krinsky, Itzhak & Robb, A Leslie, 1986. "On Approximating the Statistical Properties of Elasticities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(4), pages 715-19, November.
    3. Anni Huhtala & Eija Pouta, 2009. "Benefit Incidence of Public Recreation Areas—Have the Winners Taken Almost All?," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 63-79, May.
    4. Stephan Klasen, 2008. "The Efficiency of Equity," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 257-274.
    5. Loomis John B, 2011. "Incorporating Distributional Issues into Benefit Cost Analysis: Why, How, and Two Empirical Examples Using Non-market Valuation," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-24, January.
    6. Kinell, Gerda & Söderqvist, Tore & Elmgren, Ragnar & Walve, Jacob & Franzén, Frida, 2012. "Cost-Benefit Analysis in a Framework of Stakeholder Involvement and Integrated Coastal Zone Modeling," CERE Working Papers 2012:1, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics.
    7. W. Michael Hanemann, 1984. "Welfare Evaluations in Contingent Valuation Experiments with Discrete Responses," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 66(3), pages 332-341.
    8. Vining Aidan & Weimer David L, 2010. "An Assessment of Important Issues Concerning the Application of Benefit-Cost Analysis to Social Policy," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-40, July.
    9. McGuire, Martin C & Aaron, Henry J, 1969. "Efficiency and Equity in the Optimal Supply of a Public Good," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(1), pages 31-39, February.
    10. Jay, Marion & Peters, Karin & Buijs, Arjen E. & Gentin, Sandra & Kloek, Marjolein E. & O'Brien, Liz, 2012. "Towards access for all? Policy and research on access of ethnic minority groups to natural areas in four European countries," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 4-11.
    11. Laura O. Taylor & Ronald G. Cummings, 1999. "Unbiased Value Estimates for Environmental Goods: A Cheap Talk Design for the Contingent Valuation Method," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 649-665, June.
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