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The Relative Contribution of Genetic and Environmental Factors to Cancer Risk and Cancer Mortality in Norway

Author

Listed:
  • Leuven, Edwin

    () (Dept. of Economics, University of Oslo)

  • Plug, Erik

    () (University of Amsterdam)

  • Marte, Rønning

    () (Statistics Norway, Research Department)

Abstract

Using Norwegian cancer registry data we study twin and non-twin siblings to decompose variation in cancer at most common sites and cancer mortality into a genetic, shared environment and individual (unshared environmental) component. Regardless the source of sibling variation, our findings indicate that genes dominate over shared environment in explaining relatively more of the variation in cancer at most common cancer sites (but lung and skin cancer) and cancer mortality. The vast majority of the variation in cancer and cancer mortality, however, is explained by individual (unshared environmental) factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Leuven, Edwin & Plug, Erik & Marte, Rønning, 2014. "The Relative Contribution of Genetic and Environmental Factors to Cancer Risk and Cancer Mortality in Norway," Memorandum 05/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2014_005
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    File URL: http://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2014/memo-05-2014.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Almond, Douglas & Currie, Janet, 2011. "Human Capital Development before Age Five," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 15, pages 1315-1486, Elsevier.
    2. Charles F. Manski, 2011. "Genes, Eyeglasses, and Social Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(4), pages 83-94, Fall.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cancer; Twins; Heritability; Environment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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