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Women's and men's responses to in-work benefits: The influence of younger children

Author

Listed:
  • Andrén, Daniela

    () (Örebro University School of Business)

  • Andrén, Thomas

    () (The Swedish Confederation of Professional Associations and IZA)

Abstract

This study examines how the non-targeted earned income tax credit (EITC) introduced in Sweden in 2007 has affected the labor supply of men and women living together in two-adault households and the extent to which children affect related outcomes. Using a structural discrete labor supply model for two adult households, we estimate the impact of the EITC on both labor supply and disposable income separately for households with and without children. Our results suggest that wage elasticities differ for men and women with or without children, a result that is in line with earlier literature. However, women increased their labor supply bu 0.9 percent regardless of children in the household, whereas men with children increased their labor supply by approximately 0.5 percent and those without children increased their labor supply by 0.7 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrén, Daniela & Andrén, Thomas, 2014. "Women's and men's responses to in-work benefits: The influence of younger children," Working Papers 2014:1, Örebro University, School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:oruesi:2014_001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lennart Flood & Jörgen Hansen & Roger Wahlberg, 2004. "Household Labor Supply and Welfare Participation in Sweden," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    2. Keane, Michael & Moffitt, Robert, 1998. "A Structural Model of Multiple Welfare Program Participation and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 553-589, August.
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    4. Herwig Immervoll & Henrik Jacobsen Kleven & Claus Thustrup Kreiner & Emmanuel Saez, 2007. "Welfare reform in European countries: a microsimulation analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(516), pages 1-44, January.
    5. Nada Eissa & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 1996. "Labor Supply Response to the Earned Income Tax Credit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 605-637.
    6. Moffitt, Robert, 1983. "An Economic Model of Welfare Stigma," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 1023-1035, December.
    7. Lennart Flood & Roger Wahlberg & Elina Pylkkänen, 2007. "From Welfare to Work: Evaluating a Tax and Benefit Reform Targeted at Single Mothers in Sweden," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(3), pages 443-471, September.
    8. Emmanuel Saez, 2002. "Optimal Income Transfer Programs: Intensive versus Extensive Labor Supply Responses," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(3), pages 1039-1073.
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    11. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-90-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb & Hsein Kew, 2001. "The Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator (MITTS)," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2001n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    structural discrete labor supply model; EITC; younger children; two-adult households;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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