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A Two-State Capital Asset Pricing Model with Unobservable States

We derive theoretical discrete time asset pricing restrictions on the within state conditional mean equations for the market portfolio and for individual assets under the assumptions: (1) the conditional CAPM holds; (2) asset returns are driven by an underlying unobserved two-state discrete Markov process. We show that the market risk-premiums in the two states can be decomposed into a standard CAPM volatility-level premium plus an additional volatility-uncertainty premium. The latter premium is increasing in the market price of risk, the uncertainty about the next period's state and the difference in volatility between the two states. In an empirical application the model is estimated for the U.S. stock market 1836-2003. We apply a discrete mixture of two Normal Inverse Gaussian (NIG) distributions to represent the return characteristics in the unobservable states. Our results show that the high-risk regime has a volatility of 36.28 % on an annual basis while the low-risk regime has just 14.42%, and the latter is much more frequent. Stock returns display characteristics that support our specification of within state NIG distributions as an alternative to Normal distributions. The risk premiums for the two regimes are 2.79% and 17.86% on an annual basis, but the volatility-uncertainty premium for the two states are shown to give an unimportant contribution to the estimated risk premium. The most striking result, from a practical point of view, is that the average sample risk premium of 4% belongs to the highest quintiles of the estimated conditional risk premiums.

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File URL: http://project.nek.lu.se/publications/workpap/Papers/WP04_28.pdf
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Paper provided by Lund University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2004:28.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 06 Dec 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2004_028
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Box 7082, S-220 07 Lund,Sweden
Phone: +46 +46 222 0000
Fax: +46 +46 2224613
Web page: http://www.nek.lu.se/en

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  1. Scott Mayfield, E., 2004. "Estimating the market risk premium," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 465-496, September.
  2. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
  3. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen, 1997. "Processes of normal inverse Gaussian type," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 41-68.
  4. Luboš Pástor & Robert F. Stambaugh, 2000. "The Equity Premium and Structural Breaks," CRSP working papers 519, Center for Research in Security Prices, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago.
  5. Morten B. Jensen & Asger Lunde, 2001. "The NIG-S&ARCH model: a fat-tailed, stochastic, and autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic volatility model," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 4(2), pages 10.
  6. Adrian R. Pagan & G. William Schwert, 1989. "Alternative Models For Conditional Stock Volatility," NBER Working Papers 2955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. French, Kenneth R. & Schwert, G. William & Stambaugh, Robert F., 1987. "Expected stock returns and volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 3-29, September.
  8. L. Ingber, 1996. "Adaptive simulated annealing (ASA): Lessons learned," Lester Ingber Papers 96as, Lester Ingber.
  9. Andrew Ang & Geert Bekaert, 2002. "International Asset Allocation With Regime Shifts," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(4), pages 1137-1187.
  10. L. Ingber, 1993. "Simulated annealing: Practice versus theory," Lester Ingber Papers 93sa, Lester Ingber.
  11. Hamilton, James D., 1988. "Rational-expectations econometric analysis of changes in regime : An investigation of the term structure of interest rates," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 385-423.
  12. Hamilton, James D, 1989. "A New Approach to the Economic Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series and the Business Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 357-84, March.
  13. Goffe, William L. & Ferrier, Gary D. & Rogers, John, 1994. "Global optimization of statistical functions with simulated annealing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 65-99.
  14. Goldfeld, Stephen M. & Quandt, Richard E., 1973. "A Markov model for switching regressions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 3-15, March.
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