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How Fast Do Banks Adjust? A Dynamic Model of Labor-Use with an Application to Swedish Banks

  • Kumbhakar, Subal C.

    (Department of Economics)

  • Heshmati, Almas

    ()

    (Dept. of Economic Statistics, Stockholm School of Economics)

  • Hjalmarsson, Lennart

    (Department of Economics)

This paper deals with a dynamic adjustment process in which adjustment of a key variable input (labor) towards its desired level is modeled in a panel data context. The partial adjustment type model is extended to incorporate firm- and time-specific adjustment parameter. A flexible (translog) labor requirement function is used to represent the desired level of labor-use. It is specified as a function of a vector of outputs and other firm-specific variables. Labor-use inefficiency is defined as the ratio of actual to desired level of employment. Productivity growth is defined in terms of a shift in the labor requirement function. Swedish banking data is used as an application of the above model.

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Paper provided by Stockholm School of Economics in its series SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance with number 411.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: 08 Nov 2000
Date of revision: Nov 2001
Publication status: Published in Journal of Productivity Analysis, 2002, pages 79-102.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0411
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Economic Research Institute, Stockholm School of Economics, P.O. Box 6501, 113 83 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46-(0)8-736 90 00
Fax: +46-(0)8-31 01 57
Web page: http://www.hhs.se/
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  1. Allen N. Berger & David B. Humphrey, 1997. "Efficiency of financial institutions: international survey and directions for future research," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Sealey, Calvin W, Jr & Lindley, James T, 1977. "Inputs, Outputs, and a Theory of Production and Cost at Depository Financial Institutions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1251-66, September.
  3. Diewert, W E, 1974. "Functional Forms for Revenue and Factor Requirements Functions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 15(1), pages 119-30, February.
  4. Kumbhakar, Subal C & Sarkar, Subrata, 2003. " Deregulation, Ownership, and Productivity Growth in the Banking Industry: Evidence from India," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 403-24, June.
  5. Baltagi, Badi H. & Griffin, James M., 1997. "Pooled estimators vs. their heterogeneous counterparts in the context of dynamic demand for gasoline," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 303-327, April.
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