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Self-employment and parenthood

Author

Listed:
  • Wallin, Tina

    () (Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE), Jönköping International Business School, Sweden)

Abstract

Studies from a multitude of countries suggest that women become self-employed after having children to facilitate the work-family balance. In Sweden, generous parental leave and heavily subsided childcare is available, facilitating for parents to hold salaried jobs. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether having children increases the likelihood of individuals being self-employed. One major contribution is that this study covers the whole population, including men, with a quantitative analysis, instead of a sample through interviews and/or surveys. The results suggest that most individuals are less likely to be self-employed after having children, thus contrasting most other studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Wallin, Tina, 2017. "Self-employment and parenthood," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 453, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0453
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    File URL: https://static.sys.kth.se/itm/wp/cesis/cesiswp453.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1.
    2. Martin Andersson & Johan P Larsson, 2016. "Local entrepreneurship clusters in cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 39-66.
    3. Davidsson, Per & Honig, Benson, 2003. "The role of social and human capital among nascent entrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 301-331, May.
    4. Levesque, Moren & Shepherd, Dean A. & Douglas, Evan J., 2002. "Employment or self-employment: A dynamic utility-maximizing model," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 189-210, May.
    5. Dunn, Thomas & Holtz-Eakin, Douglas, 2000. "Financial Capital, Human Capital, and the Transition to Self-Employment: Evidence from Intergenerational Links," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 282-305, April.
    6. Douglas, Evan J. & Shepherd, Dean A., 2000. "Entrepreneurship as a utility maximizing response," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 231-251, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    self-employment; parenthood; children;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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