IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Social Capital and Market Centralisation: A Two-Sector Model

We develop a two-sector model to analyze which kind of social organization generates social capital. The hypothesis is that social capital must be added as an important production factor when considering decentralization of production. Thus, market centralization processes in a capitalist society eventually may fragmentize and thus destroy social capital if the positive externality of local production and social capital is not taken into account. To our knowledge, no such attempt to model social capital has yet been undertaken and this gap or ‘missing link’ in economic debates has to be developed to grasp a more holistic understanding of the big differences in the wealth of nations or regions. The model shows that if the policy maker decides to centralize the economy, then the economy moves from an potentially stable equilibrium to an unstable one that may under certain condition even fluctuate forever.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.hha.dk/nat/wper/04-12_odpgts.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 04-12.

as
in new window

Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 10 Dec 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2004_012
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
Web page: http://www.asb.dk/departments/nat.aspx

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Benhabib, Jess & Nishimura, Kazuo, 1983. "Competitive Equilibrium Cycles," Working Papers 83-30, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  2. Svendsen, G.T., 1998. "Social Capital, Economic Growth and Transition Economies," Papers 98-2, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
  3. Anders Poulsen & Gert Svendsen, 2005. "Social Capital and Endogenous Preferences," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 171-196, April.
  4. Paldam, Martin & Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard, 2000. "An essay on social capital: looking for the fire behind the smoke," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 339-366, June.
  5. Drugeon, Jean-Pierre & Venditti, Alain, 2001. "Intersectoral external effects, multiplicities & indeterminacies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 765-787, May.
  6. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  7. Aditya Goenka & Odile Poulsen, 2005. "Indeterminacy and labor augmenting externalities," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 143-166, December.
  8. Paldam, M. & Svendsen, G.T., 2000. "Missing Social Capital and the Transition in Eastern Europe," Papers 00-5, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
  9. Paldam, Martin, 2000. " Social Capital: One or Many? Definition and Measurement," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(5), pages 629-53, December.
  10. Jean-Pierre Drugeon & Odile Poulsen & Alain Venditti, 2003. "On Intersectoral allocations, factors substitutability and multiple long-run growth paths," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 175-183, 01.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2004_012. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Helle Vinbaek Stenholt)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.