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The Ultimatum Game Revisited

Author

Listed:
  • Tullberg, Jan

    (Dept. of Business Administration, Stockholm School of Economics)

Abstract

The starting point of this article is the result of one ultimatum game experiment - one of many showing a huge deviation from the predictions of micro theory. However, further analysis gives an explanation of subject behavior that deserves to be seen as rational, if assumptions, such as a total secrecy resulting in no effects on reputation, are questioned. Responders' actual behavior can be understood as adjusted to generally realistic reputation effects, and the choices of the Proposers are surprisingly attuned to actual Responder demands. If seen in this light, the subjects seem to understand the situation and behave accordingly.

Suggested Citation

  • Tullberg, Jan, 1999. "The Ultimatum Game Revisited," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Business Administration 1999:2, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 10 Jan 2002.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhb:hastba:1999_002
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    File URL: http://swoba.hhs.se/hastba/papers/hastba1999_002.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert H. Frank & Thomas Gilovich & Dennis T. Regan, 1993. "Does Studying Economics Inhibit Cooperation?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 159-171, Spring.
    2. Marwell, Gerald & Ames, Ruth E., 1981. "Economists free ride, does anyone else? : Experiments on the provision of public goods, IV," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 295-310, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ultimatum; buffer; reputation; spite; altruism;
    All these keywords.

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