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The Costs of Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change: Estimates Derived from a Meta-Analysis of the Literature

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  • Terry Barker and Katie Jenkins

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Terry Barker and Katie Jenkins, 2007. "The Costs of Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change: Estimates Derived from a Meta-Analysis of the Literature," Human Development Occasional Papers (1992-2007) HDOCPA-2007-02, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  • Handle: RePEc:hdr:hdocpa:hdocpa-2007-02
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    File URL: http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2007-2008/papers/Barker_Terry%20and%20Jenkins_Katie.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Terry Barker and Paul Ekins, 2004. "The Costs of Kyoto for the US Economy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 53-72.
    2. J. E. Stiglitz, 1999. "Introduction," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 28(3), pages 249-254, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Diaz Anadon, Laura & Chan, Gabe & Bosetti, Valentina & Nemet, Gregory & Verdolini, Elena, 2014. "Energy Technology Expert Elicitations for Policy: Workshops, Modeling, and Meta-analysis," Climate Change and Sustainable Development 188381, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    2. Richard Rosen & Edeltraud Guenther, 2014. "The Economics of Mitigating Climate Change?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(4), pages 57-81.
    3. Gregory F. Nemet & Laura Diaz Anadon & Elena Verdolini, 2016. "Quantifying the Effects of Expert Selection and Elicitation Design on Experts’ Confidence in their Judgments about Future Energy Technologies," Working Papers 2016.61, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Terry Barker & Douglas Crawford-Brown, 2013. "Are estimated costs of stringent mitigation biased?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 129-138, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human development; climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • Y8 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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