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The Economic Crisis and Medical Care Usage


  • Annamaria Lusardi

    () (Department of Economics, Dartmouth College)

  • Daniel Schneider

    () (Department of Sociology and Office of Population Research, Princeton University,)

  • Peter Tufano


We use a unique, nationally representative cross-national dataset to document the reduction in individuals' usage of routine non-emergency medical care in the midst of the economic crisis. A substantially larger fraction of Americans have reduced medical care than have individuals in Great Britain, Canada, France, and Germany, all countries with universal health care systems. At the national level, reductions in medical care are related to the degree to which individuals must pay for it, and within countries are strongly associated with exogenous shocks to wealth and employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Annamaria Lusardi & Daniel Schneider & Peter Tufano, 2010. "The Economic Crisis and Medical Care Usage," Harvard Business School Working Papers 10-079, Harvard Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:hbs:wpaper:10-079

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Uri Ben-Zion & Yuval Cohen & Ruth Peled & TAL SHAVIT, 2007. "Decision-Making and the Newsvendor Problem – An Experimental Study," Working Papers 0711, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Martin A. Lariviere & Evan L. Porteus, 1999. "Stalking Information: Bayesian Inventory Management with Unobserved Lost Sales," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(3), pages 346-363, March.
    3. Gary E. Bolton & Elena Katok, 2008. "Learning by Doing in the Newsvendor Problem: A Laboratory Investigation of the Role of Experience and Feedback," Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, INFORMS, vol. 10(3), pages 519-538, September.
    4. Mirko Kremer & Stefan Minner & Luk N. Van Wassenhove, 2010. "Do Random Errors Explain Newsvendor Behavior?," Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, INFORMS, vol. 12(4), pages 673-681, July.
    5. Cade Massey & George Wu, 2005. "Detecting Regime Shifts: The Causes of Under- and Overreaction," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 51(6), pages 932-947, June.
    6. Xuanming Su, 2008. "Bounded Rationality in Newsvendor Models," Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, INFORMS, vol. 10(4), pages 566-589, May.
    7. Giora Harpaz & Wayne Y. Lee & Robert L. Winkler, 1982. "Learning, Experimentation, and the Optimal Output Decisions of a Competitive Firm," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(6), pages 589-603, June.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Economic Crisis and Medical Care Usage
      by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-05-12 16:56:38


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Annamaria Lusardi & Daniel Schneider & Peter Tufano, 2011. "Financially Fragile Households: Evidence and Implications," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(1 (Spring), pages 83-150.
    2. Tekin, Erdal & McClellan, Chandler & Minyard, Karen Jean, 2013. "Health and Health Behaviors during the Worst of Times: Evidence from the Great Recession," IZA Discussion Papers 7538, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Janet Currie & Erdal Tekin, 2015. "Is There a Link between Foreclosure and Health?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 63-94, February.
    4. Lin, Haizhen & Ketcham, Jonathan D. & Rosenquist, James N. & Simon, Kosali I., 2013. "Financial distress and use of mental health care: Evidence from antidepressant prescription claims," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 449-453.
    5. McInerney, Melissa & Mellor, Jennifer M., 2012. "Recessions and seniors’ health, health behaviors, and healthcare use: Analysis of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 744-751.
    6. Atalay, Kadir & Bakhtiar, Fayzan & Cheung, Stephen & Slonim, Robert, 2014. "Savings and prize-linked savings accounts," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PA), pages 86-106.
    7. Boen, Courtney & Yang, Y. Claire, 2016. "The physiological impacts of wealth shocks in late life: Evidence from the Great Recession," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 221-230.
    8. Rechel, Boika & Suhrcke, Marc & Tsolova, Svetla & Suk, Jonathan E. & Desai, Monica & McKee, Martin & Stuckler, David & Abubakar, Ibrahim & Hunter, Paul & Senek, Michaela & Semenza, Jan C., 2011. "Economic crisis and communicable disease control in Europe: A scoping study among national experts," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 168-175.
    9. Erdal Tekin & Chandler McClellan & Karen Jean Minyard, 2013. "Health and Health Behaviors during the Worst of Times," NBER Working Papers 19234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Holmes & Jonathan Skinner, 2013. "Is This Time Different? The Slowdown in Healthcare Spending," NBER Working Papers 19700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. repec:kap:hcarem:v:20:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10729-015-9349-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Okeke, Edward N., 2013. "Brain drain: Do economic conditions “push” doctors out of developing countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 169-178.
    13. Yilmazer, Tansel & Babiarz, Patryk & Liu, Fen, 2015. "The impact of diminished housing wealth on health in the United States: Evidence from the Great Recession," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 234-241.

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    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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