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L'OMC face à la crise des négociations multilatérales


  • Jean-Marc Siroën

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - Université Paris-Dauphine)


The latest WTO Round launched in Doha in 2001 has once again stalled. Even if an agreement were reached it is not certain it would be ratified by the US Congress. The latest delay is due in part to the changing economic context in which the negotiations are taking place, some of which changes are due to decisions made during the course of the negotiations. Governments and public opinion are increasingly in favor of bilateral negotiations in which it is possible to include new subjects rejected in the Doha multilateral negotiations. These include rules on labor and environmental standards, compe-tition policy, investment, and government procurement. The assertiveness of emerging economies has upset the co-leadership positions of the US and the EU and argues for a new, as yet-to-be determined, negotiating process. The latest economic crisis has raised question about the objectives of the agriculture negotiations and has revealed the difficulties faced by an organization that thinks long-term of adapting to changes in the short term. This paper’s recommendations are aimed at improving the ability of the WTO to operate under current conditions and advocates the inclusion of new negotiating topics. If the principle of decision by consensus is not revised the rush to bilateralism is likely to continue, which is dangerous because of its discriminatory character.

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  • Jean-Marc Siroën, 2016. "L'OMC face à la crise des négociations multilatérales," Working Papers hal-01399859, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01399859
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul Krugman, 1986. "Strategic Trade Policy and the New International Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262610450, January.
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    3. Margaret Levi & Gillian H. Murphy, 2006. "Coalitions of Contention: The Case of the WTO Protests in Seattle," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 54, pages 651-670, December.
    4. Daria Taglioni, 2002. "Exchange Rate Volatility as a Barrier to Trade: New Methodologies and Recent Evidence," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 89-90, pages 227-259.
    5. Paul Krugman, 1997. "Pop Internationalism," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262611333, January.
    6. Amrita Narlikar, 2006. "Fairness in International Trade Negotiations: Developing Countries in the GATT and WTO," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(8), pages 1005-1029, August.
    7. Harrison, Ann & Hanson, Gordon, 1999. "Who gains from trade reform? Some remaining puzzles," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 125-154, June.
    8. Debasri Mukherjee & Susan Pozo, 2011. "Exchange-rate volatility and trade: a semiparametric approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(13), pages 1617-1627.
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    Doha; OMC; négociations commerciales;

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