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Effects Of Anti-Tobacco Brands Ad Parodies On Cigarette Brands Attitude


  • Béatrice Parguel

    () (DRM - Dauphine Recherches en Management - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Renaud Lunardo

    (Bordeaux Ecole de Management - Bordeaux Management School (BEM))

  • Jean-Charles Chebat

    (HEC Montréal - HEC Montréal)


This paper compares the effects of anti-tobacco ad parodies and visual cigarette package warnings on emotional and cognitive responses of young adults. The findings indicate that graphic-only ad parodies can compete with warnings in their attempt to damage consumers' attitude toward tobacco brands through the health beliefs they lead consumers to associate to the brand. On the contrary, text-only ad parodies prove counterproductive and lead to a boomerang effect characterized by an increase in consumers' tobacco brand attitude.

Suggested Citation

  • Béatrice Parguel & Renaud Lunardo & Jean-Charles Chebat, 2012. "Effects Of Anti-Tobacco Brands Ad Parodies On Cigarette Brands Attitude," Post-Print halshs-00703906, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00703906
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maheswaran, Durairaj, 1994. " Country of Origin as a Stereotype: Effects of Consumer Expertise and Attribute Strength on Product Evaluations," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(2), pages 354-365, September.
    2. Pechmann, Cornelia & Knight, Susan J, 2002. " An Experimental Investigation of the Joint Effects of Advertising and Peers on Adolescents' Beliefs and Intentions about Cigarette Consumption," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 5-19, June.
    3. Xinshu Zhao & John G. Lynch & Qimei Chen, 2010. "Reconsidering Baron and Kenny: Myths and Truths about Mediation Analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(2), pages 197-206, August.
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    ad parodies; persuasion; anti-tobacco activism;

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