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Career Interruptions: how do they impact pension rights?


  • Karine Briard

    (CNAV - CNAV - CNAV)

  • Cindy Duc

    (Chercheur Indépendant)

  • Najat El Mekkaoui de Freitas

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - Université Paris-Dauphine)

  • Bérangère Legendre

    () (IREGE - Institut de Recherche en Gestion et en Economie - USMB [Université de Savoie] [Université de Chambéry] - Université Savoie Mont Blanc)

  • Sabine Mage

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - Université Paris-Dauphine)


The aim of this article is to analyze the question of career interruptions and to evaluate their impact on pension retirement for French private sector workers. Using the last French survey on households' wealth (2003-2004), we first study the career setbacks for individuals born between 1938 and 1948. We highlight the new trends in professional paths. The risk of unemployment and job flexibility has sharply risen. As a consequence, some cohorts appear to be more exposed to career interruptions. Second, we determine how pension rights for French employees are affected by different career accidents. We consider unemployment, part-time employment and inactivity periods. Our results show how, by compensating for some career accidents, the French legislation allows individuals to receive, in some cases, the same level of pension that they would have received with a smooth professional path.

Suggested Citation

  • Karine Briard & Cindy Duc & Najat El Mekkaoui de Freitas & Bérangère Legendre & Sabine Mage, 2011. "Career Interruptions: how do they impact pension rights?," Post-Print hal-00951830, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00951830
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Smith, Nina, 2002. "Children and Career Interruptions: The Family Gap in Denmark," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(276), pages 609-629, November.
    2. Carine Burrican & Nicole Roth, 2000. "Les parcours de fin de carrière des générations 1912-1941 : l'impact du cadre institutionnel," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 335(1), pages 63-79.
    3. Karine Briard & Cindy Duc & Najat El Mekkaoui de Freitas & Bérangère Legendre, 2008. "Aléas de carrière, inégalités et retraite," Post-Print halshs-00257782, HAL.
    4. Antoine Bommier & Thierry Magnac & Muriel Roger, 2000. "Le marché du travail à l’approche de la retraite : évolutions en France entre 1982 et 1999," Research Unit Working Papers 0211, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
    5. Miguel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2008. "Women’s family-related career breaks: a long-term British perspective," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 127-167, June.
    6. Shoba Arun & Thankom Arun & Vani Borooah, 2004. "The Effect Of Career Breaks On The Working Lives Of Women," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 65-84.
    7. Laurent Caussat, 1996. "Retraite et correction des aléas de carrière," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 291(1), pages 185-201.
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    More about this item


    Social security; Pensions; Career interruption;


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