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Measuring demand for sanitation in developing countries: A new theoretical and methodological framework for contingent valuation surveys

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  • Julien Milanesi

    () (CATT - Centre d'Analyse Théorique et de Traitement des données économiques - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour)

Abstract

A review shows that contingent valuation (CV) studies implemented in developing countries are generally used to measure demands (for water, sanitation or health services) and neglect the valuation of nonmarket goods (like ecosystems, biodiversity, or environmental amenities). These studies also make few references to the standard theoretical framework, because that framework, which reflects the much debated source of welfare economics, is useless for surveys that focus on people's demand. Yet paradoxically, it continues to influence survey design and data interpretation. This article therefore aims to complete, theoretically, the construction of an autonomous research program to establish demand measurement guidelines in developing countries and show, through a survey implemented in Moshi (Tanzania) about demand for sanitation, some methodological changes that would result from a new theoretical perspective built on recent results from behavioral economics and economic psychology.

Suggested Citation

  • Julien Milanesi, 2010. "Measuring demand for sanitation in developing countries: A new theoretical and methodological framework for contingent valuation surveys," Post-Print hal-00633288, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00633288
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00633288
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Whittington, Dale, 1998. "Administering contingent valuation surveys in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 21-30, January.
    2. Onwujekwe, Obinna & Nwagbo, Douglas, 2002. "Investigating starting-point bias: a survey of willingness to pay for insecticide-treated nets," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(12), pages 2121-2130, December.
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    4. Payne, John W & Bettman, James R & Schkade, David A, 1999. "Measuring Constructed Preferences: Towards a Building Code," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 19(1-3), pages 243-270, December.
    5. Julien Milanesi & Amos Mhina & Bernard Contamin, 2006. "The improvement of the sanitation services in Moshi (Tanzania)," Post-Print hal-00494014, HAL.
    6. Shwarz, Norbert, 1999. "Defensible Preferences and the Public: Commentary on "Measuring Constructed Preferences: Towards a Building Code" by Payne, Bettman and Schkade," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 19(1-3), pages 271-272, December.
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    16. Whittington, Dale & Smith, V. Kerry & Okorafor, Apia & Okore, Augustine & Liu, Jin Long & McPhail, Alexander, 1992. "Giving respondents time to think in contingent valuation studies: A developing country application," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 205-225, May.
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