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Household Disaster Management in Disaster Prone II of Mt. Slamet

Author

Listed:
  • Diah Setyawati Dewanti

    ("Faculty of Economics and Business Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia" Author-2-Name: Dusadee Ayuwat Author-2-Workplace-Name: "Department of Sociology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand" Author-3-Name: Sekson Yongvanit Author-3-Workplace-Name: "Department of Economics Development, Faculty of Economics and Business Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia " Author-4-Name: Author-4-Workplace-Name: Author-5-Name: Author-5-Workplace-Name: Author-6-Name: Author-6-Workplace-Name: Author-7-Name: Author-7-Workplace-Name: Author-8-Name: Author-8-Workplace-Name:)

Abstract

"Objective – This research aims to describe the factors influencing household disaster management of those living in the disaster prone II area of Mt.Slamet in Indonesia. The study focuses on the disaster prone II area surrounding Mt. Slamet, including five (5) villages from three (3) districts. Methodology/Technique – A quantitative research methods is employed in this study. A total of 538 households were selected for examination using a two-stage stratified and systematic sampling. To describe the direct and indirect factors supporting livelihoods, Path analysis using a Stata tool analysis was used. Findings – Multicollinearity was tested prior to the Path analysis. Among the 26 independent variables used, 12 independent variables had a statistical significance level of between 0.05 and 0.01. Labor force, transportation access, income, utilization of non-chemical fertilizer, transformation of process and structure, migration, livelihood changing, healthy household members, vehicle ownership, size of land for agriculture, access to electricity, and household networking to other parties located outside the village were the direct and indirect factors supporting disaster management of households living in the disaster prone II area of Mt. Slamet, Indonesia. Novelty – The Indonesian government has classified the disaster prone II area as the highest risk area in which households are allowed to build their settlements. The study ultimately concludes that the government and other sectors could support households to strengthen their ability to manage disaster. "

Suggested Citation

  • Diah Setyawati Dewanti, 2018. "Household Disaster Management in Disaster Prone II of Mt. Slamet," GATR Journals gjbssr511, Global Academy of Training and Research (GATR) Enterprise.
  • Handle: RePEc:gtr:gatrjs:gjbssr511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household Disaster Management; Disaster Prone; Path Analysis; Mt.Slamet; Indonesia. ;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General

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