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Supervisory stress tests

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Abstract

This article describes the background, design choices and particular details of stress tests used as part of an overall supervisory regime; that is, their formal integration into the process of the ongoing prudential supervision of banks and other large financial institutions. We then describe how the U.S. CCAR/DFAST regime is designed and what that means for the macroprudential vs. microprudential nature of the U.S. exercises. We argue routine stress tests have the potential to substantially change the nature of the supervisory process. In addition, we argue that a great deal depends on the philosophy underpinning modeling decisions, which has not received as much attention as scenario design, disclosure or other stress test design choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Hirtle, Beverly & Lehnert, Andreas, 2014. "Supervisory stress tests," Staff Reports 696, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:696
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Viral Acharya & Robert Engle & Matthew Richardson, 2012. "Capital Shortfall: A New Approach to Ranking and Regulating Systemic Risks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 59-64, May.
    2. Del Negro, Marco & Otrok, Christopher, 2007. "99 Luftballons: Monetary policy and the house price boom across U.S. states," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 1962-1985, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Flannery, Mark & Hirtle, Beverly & Kovner, Anna, 2017. "Evaluating the information in the federal reserve stress tests," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-18.
    2. Marcelo Fernandes & Deniz Igan & Marcelo Pinheiro, 2015. "March Madness in Wall Street: (What) Does the Market Learn from Stress Tests?," Working Papers 771, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Christoph Aymanns & J. Doyne Farmer & Alissa M. Keinniejenhuis & Thom Wetzer, 2017. "Models of Financial Stability and their Application in Stress Tests," Working Papers on Finance 1805, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    4. Thomas L. Hogan & Neil R. Meredith, 2016. "Risk and risk-based capital of U.S. bank holding companies," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 86-112, February.
    5. Carboni, Marika & Fiordelisi, Franco & Ricci, Ornella & Lopes, Francesco Saverio Stentella, 2017. "Surprised or not surprised? The investors’ reaction to the comprehensive assessment preceding the launch of the banking union," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 122-132.
    6. Paul S. Calem & Ricardo Correa & Seung Jung Lee, 2016. "Prudential Policies and Their Impact on Credit in the United States," International Finance Discussion Papers 1186, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Berlin, Mitchell, 2015. "Disclosure of stress test results," Working Papers 15-31, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    8. Arnould, Guillaume & Dehmej, Salim, 2016. "Is the European banking system robust? An evaluation through the lens of the ECB׳s Comprehensive Assessment," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 126-144.
    9. David M. Arseneau, 2017. "How Would US Banks Fare in a Negative Interest Rate Environment?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-030, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    stress tests; bank capital;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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