IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedgfe/2019-22.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Marketplace Lending and Consumer Credit Outcomes : Evidence from Prosper

Author

Abstract

In 2005, Prosper launched the first peer-to-peer lending website in the US, allowing for consumers to apply for and receive loans entirely online. To understand the effect of this new credit source, we match application-level data from Prosper to credit bureau data. Post application, borrowers' credit scores increase and their credit card utilization rates fall relative to non-borrowers in the short run. In the longer run, total debt levels for borrowers are higher that of non-borrowers. Differences in mortgage debt are particularly large and increasing over time. Despite increased debt levels relative to non-borrowers, delinquency rates for borrowers are significantly lower.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy E. Dore & Traci L. Mach, 2019. "Marketplace Lending and Consumer Credit Outcomes : Evidence from Prosper," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-022, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2019-22
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2019.022
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/feds/files/2019022pap.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.17016/FEDS.2019.022?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bhutta, Neil, 2014. "Payday loans and consumer financial health," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 230-242.
    2. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S., 2007. "Baby Boomer retirement security: The roles of planning, financial literacy, and housing wealth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 205-224, January.
    3. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2011. "Household Leverage and the Recession of 2007 to 2009," SBP Research Bulletin, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department, vol. 7, pages 125-173.
    4. Morse, Adair, 2011. "Payday lenders: Heroes or villains?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(1), pages 28-44, October.
    5. Scott Carrell & Jonathan Zinman, 2014. "In Harm's Way? Payday Loan Access and Military Personnel Performance," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(9), pages 2805-2840.
    6. Brian T. Melzer, 2011. "The Real Costs of Credit Access: Evidence from the Payday Lending Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 517-555.
    7. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2010. "Household Leverage and the Recession of 2007–09," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 58(1), pages 74-117, August.
    8. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Gomes, Francisco J & Haliassos, Michael & Ramadorai, Tarun, 2020. "Household Finance," CEPR Discussion Papers 14502, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Christine L. Dobridge, 2018. "High‐Cost Credit and Consumption Smoothing," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(2-3), pages 407-433, March.
    3. John Y. Campbell & Howell E. Jackson & Brigitte C. Madrian & Peter Tufano, 2011. "Consumer Financial Protection," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 91-114, Winter.
    4. Neil Bhutta & Jacob Goldin & Tatiana Homonoff, 2016. "Consumer Borrowing after Payday Loan Bans," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 225-259.
    5. Dasgupta, Kabir & Mason, Brenden J., 2020. "The effect of interest rate caps on bankruptcy: Synthetic control evidence from recent payday lending bans," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 119(C).
    6. Christine L. Dobridge, 2016. "For Better and for Worse? Effects of Access to High-Cost Consumer Credit," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-056, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Barth, James R. & Hilliard, Jitka & Jahera, John S. & Sun, Yanfei, 2016. "Do state regulations affect payday lender concentration?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 14-29.
    8. Jonathan Zinman, 2014. "Consumer Credit: Too Much or Too Little (or Just Right)?," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(S2), pages 209-237.
    9. Mary Zaki, 2016. "Access to Short-term Credit and Consumption Smoothing within the Paycycle," Working Papers 2016.07, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    10. Cuffe, Harold E. & Gibbs, Christopher G., 2017. "The effect of payday lending restrictions on liquor sales," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 132-145.
    11. Bäckman, Claes & Hanspal, Tobin, 2018. "Participation and Losses in Multi-Level Marketing: Evidence from an FTC Settlement," Working Papers 2018:13, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 22 Aug 2019.
    12. Zaki, Mary, 2016. "Access to Short-term Credit and Consumption Smoothing within the Paycycle," ET: Economic Theory 232213, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    13. Desai, Chintal A. & Elliehausen, Gregory, 2017. "The effect of state bans of payday lending on consumer credit delinquencies," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 94-107.
    14. Vibhor Saxena & Ishaan Bindal & Philippe LeMay-Boucher, 2019. "Social groups and credit shocks: Evidence of inequalities in consumption smoothing," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 201901, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews.
    15. John Y. Campbell, 2016. "Restoring Rational Choice: The Challenge of Consumer Financial Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 1-30, May.
    16. Saxena, Vibhor & Bindal, Ishaan & LeMay-Boucher, Philippe, 2020. "Social groups and credit shocks: Evidence of inequalities in consumption smoothing," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 311-326.
    17. Taylor Canann & Richard Evans, 2015. "Determinants of Short-term Lender Location and Interest Rates," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 235-262, December.
    18. Robert Mayer, 2013. "When and Why Usury Should be Prohibited," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 116(3), pages 513-527, September.
    19. Terri Friedline & Nancy Kepple, 2017. "Does Community Access to Alternative Financial Services Relate to Individuals’ Use of These Services? Beyond Individual Explanations," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 51-79, March.
    20. James Barth & Jitka Hilliard & John Jahera, 2015. "Banks and Payday Lenders: Friends or Foes?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 21(2), pages 139-153, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marketplace lending; Online lending; Peer-to-peer lending; Prosper marketplace; Disintermediation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G29 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Other
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2019-22. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.