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Regime shifts in real estate markets: Time-varying effects of the U.S. and Japanese economies on house prices in Hawaii


  • John Krainer
  • James A. Wilcox


We show that house prices may be driven entirely by the demands of one identifiable group for several years and then by demands of another group at other times. We present evidence that house prices in Hawaii were subject to such regime shifts. Prices responded to demands associated with American income and wealth for most years from 1975 through 2008. From the middle of the 1980s through the early 1990s, however, house prices responded to Japanese income and wealth. Statistical tests indicate that the regime-shifting model outperformed the constant-coefficient model. The regime shifting model helps explain why and by how much elasticities with respect to income and wealth and volatilities of house prices in Hawaii varied over time.

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  • John Krainer & James A. Wilcox, 2011. "Regime shifts in real estate markets: Time-varying effects of the U.S. and Japanese economies on house prices in Hawaii," Working Paper Series 2011-24, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2011-24

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    1. Yacine Aït-Sahalia & Jonathan A. Parker & Motohiro Yogo, 2004. "Luxury Goods and the Equity Premium," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(6), pages 2959-3004, December.
    2. Chiaki Moriguchi & Emmanuel Saez, 2008. "The Evolution of Income Concentration in Japan, 1886-2005: Evidence from Income Tax Statistics," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 713-734, November.
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    Housing - Prices - Hawaii;

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