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Costly intermediation and the big push

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  • Zsolt Becsi
  • Ping Wang
  • Mark A. Wynne

Abstract

Many existing theories of financial intermediation have difficulty explaining why financial activity can generate large real effects. This paper argues that the large real effects may reflect a multiplicity of equilibria. The multiple equilibria in this paper are generated by the dynamic interactions between the savings decisions of workers and the monopolistically competitive behavior of banks. We characterize the equilibria by showing the comparative-static responses of key aggregates to changes in the pure rate of time preference, investment uncertainty, and bank costs. We find that the results depend crucially on the intertemporal elasticity of labor supply and the aggregate level of employment. Small changes in the financial system may cause the economy to shift between low- and high-employment equilibria. The high-employment, high real interest rate equilibrium is consistent with the development experience of Japan, Korea, and Taiwan with repressed financial systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Zsolt Becsi & Ping Wang & Mark A. Wynne, 1998. "Costly intermediation and the big push," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 98-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:98-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Zsolt Becsi & Ping Wang, 1997. "Financial development and growth," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 4, pages 46-62.
    11. Sussman, Oren & Zeira, Joseph, 1995. "Banking and Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 1127, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Rudiger Dornbusch & Yung Chul Park, 1987. "Korean Growth Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 18(2), pages 389-454.
    13. Zsolt Becsi & Ping Wang & Mark A. Wynne, 1998. "Endogenous market structures and financial development," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 98-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    14. Pagano, Marco, 1993. "Financial markets and growth: An overview," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 613-622, April.
    15. Colin Mayer, 1990. "Financial Systems, Corporate Finance, and Economic Development," NBER Chapters,in: Asymmetric Information, Corporate Finance, and Investment, pages 307-332 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Keywords

    Economic development;

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