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Social ties, space, and resilience: Literature review of community resilience to disasters and constituent social and built environment factors

  • Ann Carpenter
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    Communities have faced a variety of crises in recent decades, including more frequent and severe natural disasters. As applied to disasters, resilience entails the ability of a community to rebound following a hurricane, earthquake, or other disturbance. Given the importance of resilience in promoting an effective recovery, the factors that contribute to community resilience are of great interest to scholars and practitioners in many fields. Recent work has examined, for example, socioeconomic indicators that contribute to greater social vulnerability and organizational structures that contribute to a more effective recovery. The importance of strong social networks in resilience is among the most oft-repeated lessons learned in recent scholarship. This paper examines the intersection of three connected threads in the literature to understand one particular aspect of resilience: how the built environment contributes to greater resilience by supporting and encouraging strong social networks. Given that social networks positively influence resilience and that the built environment exerts influence on social networks, this literature review examines evidence linking strong social networks, a varied and integrated built environment, and greater resilience.

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    Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series FRB Atlanta Community and Economic Development Discussion Paper with number 2013-02.

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    Date of creation: 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedacd:2013-02
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    1. Barbara Entwisle, 2007. "Putting people into place," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 687-703, November.
    2. Roel Rutten & Hans Westlund & Frans Boekema, 2010. "The Spatial Dimension of Social Capital," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 863-871, June.
    3. Berkman, Lisa F. & Glass, Thomas & Brissette, Ian & Seeman, Teresa E., 2000. "From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 843-857, September.
    4. P Healey, 1998. "Building institutional capacity through collaborative approaches to urban planning," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(9), pages 1531-1546, September.
    5. Raymond Burby & Peter May, 1998. "IntergovernmentalEnvironmental Planning: Addressing the Commitment Conundrum," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 95-110.
    6. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1407-18, December.
    7. Charles C. Tu & Mark J. Eppli, 1999. "Valuing New Urbanism: The Case of Kentlands," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 425-451.
    8. Douglas Massey, 1996. "The age of extremes: Concentrated affluence and poverty in the twenty-first century," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 395-412, November.
    9. Susan L. Cutter & Bryan J. Boruff & W. Lynn Shirley, 2003. "Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 84(2), pages 242-261.
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