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Privatization in Africa: What has happened? What is to be done?

Author

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  • John Nellis

    (The Center for Global Development)

Abstract

Sub-Saharan African states urgently need expanded and more dynamic private sectors, more efficient and effective infrastructure/utility provision, and increased investment from both domestic and foreign sources. Privatization is one way to address these problems. But African states have generally been slow and reluctant privatizers; a good percentage of industrial/manufacturing and most infrastructure still remains in state hands. Given prevailing public hostility towards privatization, and widespread institutional weaknesses, such caution is defensible, but nonetheless very costly. The long-run and difficult solution is the creation and reinforcement of the institutions that underpin and guide proper market operations. In the interim, African governments and donors have little choice but to continue to experiment with the use of externally supplied substitutes for gaps in local regulatory and legal systems.

Suggested Citation

  • John Nellis, 2005. "Privatization in Africa: What has happened? What is to be done?," Working Papers 2005.127, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2005.127
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    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/Publication/NDL2005/NDL2005-127.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. D'Souza, Juliet & Megginson, William & Nash, Robert, 2007. "The effects of changes in corporate governance and restructurings on operating performance: Evidence from privatizations," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 157-184.
    2. Cabeza-García, Laura & Gómez-Ansón, Silvia, 2011. "Post-privatisation ownership concentration: Determinants and influence on firm efficiency," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 412-430, September.
    3. repec:jfr:jms111:v:9:y:2018:i:3:p:54-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:taf:oaefxx:v:5:y:2017:i:1:p:1323987 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:tefoso:v:131:y:2018:i:c:p:286-302 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Abutu, Usman Ojonugwa, 2015. "Does Privatization Increase Firm Performance in Nigeria?: An Empirical Investigation," MPRA Paper 69675, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Usman, Ojonugwa & Uwadiegwu, Ihedioha O. & Olorunmolu, Joseph O., 2015. "Debt Financing and Post-Privatization Performance of Firms: The Case of Nigerian Listed Firms," MPRA Paper 74921, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2016.
    8. Antonio Estache & L. Wren-Lewis, 2008. "Towards a Theory of Regulation for Developing Countries: Following Laffont's Lead," Working Papers ECARES 2008_018, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. Usman, Ojonugwa & Olorunmolu, Joseph O., 2015. "Does Privatization Increase Firm Performance in Nigeria?: An Empirical Investigation," MPRA Paper 69816, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Mar 2016.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Privatization; Sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • L3 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise
    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N27 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N47 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N77 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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