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A Stochastic Theory of Geographic Concentration and the Empirical Evidence in Germany

  • T. Brenner

    ()

A stochastic model of the evolution of the firm population in a region and industry is developed. This model is used to make predictions about the expected probability distribution of the firm number in regions and their dynamics. Data on the spatial distribution of firms in Germany is used to check the predictions and estimate the parameters of the model. This is done for 196 industries separately.

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File URL: ftp://137.248.191.199/RePEc/esi/discussionpapers/2005-23.pdf
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Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Papers on Economics and Evolution with number 2005-23.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2005-23
Contact details of provider: Postal: Deutschhausstrasse 10, 35032 Marburg
Phone: 064212824257
Fax: 064212828950
Web page: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb19/
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  1. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
  2. Carlo Pietrobelli, 1998. "The Socio-Economic Foundations Of Competitiveness: An Econometric Analysis of Italian Industrial Districts," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 139-155.
  3. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser, 1999. "The Geographic Concentration of Industry: Does Natural Advantage Explain Agglomeration?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1862, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Giulio Bottazzi & Giovanni Dosi & Giorgio Fagiolo & Angelo Secchi, 2004. "Sectoral and Geographical Specificities in the Spatial Structure of Economic Activities," LEM Papers Series 2004/21, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  6. Klepper, Steven, 1997. "Industry Life Cycles," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 145-81.
  7. Denis MAILLAT, 1998. "From the industrial district to the innovative milieu : Contribution to an analysis of territorialised productive organisations," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 1998017, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
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